Contribution of allergen-specific and nonspecific nasal responses to early-phase and late-phase nasal responses

Satoko Miyahara, Nobuaki Miyahara, Joseph J. Lucas, Anthony Joetham, Shikegi Matsubara, Hiroshi Ohnishi, Azzeddine Dakhama, Erwin W. Gelfand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The relative contributions of the allergen-specific early-phase nasal response and nonspecific nasal response and mast cells to the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis are not well defined. Objectives: To determine the contributions of specific reactivity, nonspecific reactivity, and mast cells to the development of early-phase and late-phase responses using a mouse model of allergic rhinitis. Methods: Sensitized wild-type and FcεRI-deficient (FcεRI-/-) mice were exposed to allergen for 3, 5, or 12 days. As indicators of nasal reactivity, respiratory frequency and nasal resistance were monitored. Results: Sensitized mice exposed to 3 days of nasal allergen challenge showed a nonspecific early-phase response. As the number of allergen exposures increased, there was progressive diminution in nonspecific responses with increased allergen-specific early-phase responses and a late-phase response. Sensitized FcεRI-/- mice did not develop nonspecific nasal responses or late-phase responses, but transfer of in vitro-differentiated wild-type mast cells into FcεRI-/- mice restored nonspecific early-phase nasal responses but not the late-phase response. Conclusion: These data identify the nonspecific nasal response as a major contributor to the early-phase response, especially during initial allergen exposure, and is dependent on mast cells. Increasing allergen exposure results in increasing allergen-specific responses, converting the nonspecific early-phase response to a late-phase response that is allergen-specific and mast cell-independent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)718-724
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume121
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Nose
Allergens
Mast Cells

Keywords

  • Allergic rhinitis
  • early-phase
  • late-phase
  • mast cell
  • mouse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Contribution of allergen-specific and nonspecific nasal responses to early-phase and late-phase nasal responses. / Miyahara, Satoko; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Lucas, Joseph J.; Joetham, Anthony; Matsubara, Shikegi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Gelfand, Erwin W.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 121, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 718-724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miyahara, Satoko ; Miyahara, Nobuaki ; Lucas, Joseph J. ; Joetham, Anthony ; Matsubara, Shikegi ; Ohnishi, Hiroshi ; Dakhama, Azzeddine ; Gelfand, Erwin W. / Contribution of allergen-specific and nonspecific nasal responses to early-phase and late-phase nasal responses. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2008 ; Vol. 121, No. 3. pp. 718-724.
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abstract = "Background: The relative contributions of the allergen-specific early-phase nasal response and nonspecific nasal response and mast cells to the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis are not well defined. Objectives: To determine the contributions of specific reactivity, nonspecific reactivity, and mast cells to the development of early-phase and late-phase responses using a mouse model of allergic rhinitis. Methods: Sensitized wild-type and FcεRI-deficient (FcεRI-/-) mice were exposed to allergen for 3, 5, or 12 days. As indicators of nasal reactivity, respiratory frequency and nasal resistance were monitored. Results: Sensitized mice exposed to 3 days of nasal allergen challenge showed a nonspecific early-phase response. As the number of allergen exposures increased, there was progressive diminution in nonspecific responses with increased allergen-specific early-phase responses and a late-phase response. Sensitized FcεRI-/- mice did not develop nonspecific nasal responses or late-phase responses, but transfer of in vitro-differentiated wild-type mast cells into FcεRI-/- mice restored nonspecific early-phase nasal responses but not the late-phase response. Conclusion: These data identify the nonspecific nasal response as a major contributor to the early-phase response, especially during initial allergen exposure, and is dependent on mast cells. Increasing allergen exposure results in increasing allergen-specific responses, converting the nonspecific early-phase response to a late-phase response that is allergen-specific and mast cell-independent.",
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AU - Joetham, Anthony

AU - Matsubara, Shikegi

AU - Ohnishi, Hiroshi

AU - Dakhama, Azzeddine

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