Continuous renal replacement therapy

Does technique influence electrolyte and bicarbonate control?

Hiroshi Morimatsu, S. Uchino, Rinaldo Bellomo, C. Ronco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objectives: Different techniques of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) might have different effects on electrolyte and acid-base control. The aim of this study was to determine whether continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) or continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) achieve better control of serum sodium, potassium and bicarbonate concentrations. Design: Retrospective controlled study. Setting: Two tertiary intensive care units. Patients: Critically ill patients with acute renal failure (ARF) treated with CVVHDF (n=49) or CVVH (n=50). Interventions: Retrieval of daily morning sodium and potassium values and arterial bicarbonate levels from computerized biochemical records before and after the initiation of CRRT for up to 2 weeks of treatment. Statistical comparison of findings. Measurements and results: Before treatment, abnormal (high or low) values were frequently observed for sodium (65.1% for CVVHDF vs. 80.0% for CVVH; NS), potassium (45.9% vs. 34.0%; NS), and bicarbonate (73.3% vs. 68.0%; NS). After treatment, however, CVVHDF was more likely to achieve serum sodium concentrations within the normal range (74.1% vs. 62.9%; p=0.0026). Both treatments decreased the mean serum potassium concentration over the first 48 h (p=0.0059 and p>0.0001, respectively), but there was no difference in terms of the normalization of serum potassium concentration during the entire treatment period (88.3% vs. 90.5%; NS). Both treatments increased the mean arterial bicarbonate concentration over the first 48 hours (p=0.011 and p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-296
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Artificial Organs
Volume26
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Renal Replacement Therapy
Bicarbonates
Electrolytes
Hemodiafiltration
Potassium
Sodium
Hemofiltration
Serum
Intensive care units
Therapeutics
Sodium Bicarbonate
Tertiary Healthcare
Acute Kidney Injury
Critical Illness
Acids
Intensive Care Units
Reference Values
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Acute renal failure
  • Bicarbonate
  • Hemodialysis
  • Hemofiltration
  • Potassium
  • Sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

Cite this

Continuous renal replacement therapy : Does technique influence electrolyte and bicarbonate control? / Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Uchino, S.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Ronco, C.

In: International Journal of Artificial Organs, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 289-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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