Consequences of basic slag on soil pH, calcium and magnesium status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents

Md Harunor Rashid Khan, Md Mukaddas Ali Bhuiyan, Syed Monzur Kabir, Hans Peter Blume, Yoko Oki, Tadashi Adachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consequences of Basic Slag (BS) on soil pH, Ca and Mg status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents were studied for 30 months. The four doses of BS at the rates of 0, 10, 20 and 30 t ha-1 and three levels of water contents such as: (a) moisture at field capacity (50% water), (b) moisture at saturated condition (100% water) and (c) wetting-drying cycle (from saturation versus field capacity) were considered for this incubation study. Basic slag at 30 t ha-1 was found to be the best dose in order of the increment in soil pH, followed by the lower doses of BS20>BS10. The BS30 treatment increased the soil pH values by about 1.0, 1.5 and 1.2 units more compared with the control in the Sarisabari soil and 2.0, 1.7 and 1.5 units more in the Purbapukuria soil under the conditions of field capacity, saturated and wetting-drying cycle, respectively. Apart from the water contents and soil conditions, the values of soil pH were also increased significantly (p≤0.05) at different periods of incubation compared with the control. Like soil pH, almost similar to and significant (p≤0.05) increased levels of Ca and Mg were determined in both the soils; regardless of water contents and incubation time. The striking changes were recorded for the rate of increments of Ca and Mg, which were 4 to 5 times higher for Ca and more than 2 times higher for Mg compared with the control after 2 months of incubation. These results suggest that the application of basic slag not only increased the Ca to the higher amount than the increment of Mg in the soils but also improved one of the important criteria of imbalance between Ca and Mg status in the soils.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)896-903
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Sciences
Volume7
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Aug 15 2007

Fingerprint

Magnesium
Sulfates
Soil
Calcium
Acids
Water

Keywords

  • Acid sulfate soils
  • Basic slag
  • Calcium and magnesium status
  • Incubation period
  • Water contents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Khan, M. H. R., Bhuiyan, M. M. A., Kabir, S. M., Blume, H. P., Oki, Y., & Adachi, T. (2007). Consequences of basic slag on soil pH, calcium and magnesium status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents. Journal of Biological Sciences, 7(6), 896-903.

Consequences of basic slag on soil pH, calcium and magnesium status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents. / Khan, Md Harunor Rashid; Bhuiyan, Md Mukaddas Ali; Kabir, Syed Monzur; Blume, Hans Peter; Oki, Yoko; Adachi, Tadashi.

In: Journal of Biological Sciences, Vol. 7, No. 6, 15.08.2007, p. 896-903.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, MHR, Bhuiyan, MMA, Kabir, SM, Blume, HP, Oki, Y & Adachi, T 2007, 'Consequences of basic slag on soil pH, calcium and magnesium status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents', Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 896-903.
Khan, Md Harunor Rashid ; Bhuiyan, Md Mukaddas Ali ; Kabir, Syed Monzur ; Blume, Hans Peter ; Oki, Yoko ; Adachi, Tadashi. / Consequences of basic slag on soil pH, calcium and magnesium status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents. In: Journal of Biological Sciences. 2007 ; Vol. 7, No. 6. pp. 896-903.
@article{9d61cd9c6c8b4e4b8cc88e4eb4319170,
title = "Consequences of basic slag on soil pH, calcium and magnesium status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents",
abstract = "Consequences of Basic Slag (BS) on soil pH, Ca and Mg status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents were studied for 30 months. The four doses of BS at the rates of 0, 10, 20 and 30 t ha-1 and three levels of water contents such as: (a) moisture at field capacity (50{\%} water), (b) moisture at saturated condition (100{\%} water) and (c) wetting-drying cycle (from saturation versus field capacity) were considered for this incubation study. Basic slag at 30 t ha-1 was found to be the best dose in order of the increment in soil pH, followed by the lower doses of BS20>BS10. The BS30 treatment increased the soil pH values by about 1.0, 1.5 and 1.2 units more compared with the control in the Sarisabari soil and 2.0, 1.7 and 1.5 units more in the Purbapukuria soil under the conditions of field capacity, saturated and wetting-drying cycle, respectively. Apart from the water contents and soil conditions, the values of soil pH were also increased significantly (p≤0.05) at different periods of incubation compared with the control. Like soil pH, almost similar to and significant (p≤0.05) increased levels of Ca and Mg were determined in both the soils; regardless of water contents and incubation time. The striking changes were recorded for the rate of increments of Ca and Mg, which were 4 to 5 times higher for Ca and more than 2 times higher for Mg compared with the control after 2 months of incubation. These results suggest that the application of basic slag not only increased the Ca to the higher amount than the increment of Mg in the soils but also improved one of the important criteria of imbalance between Ca and Mg status in the soils.",
keywords = "Acid sulfate soils, Basic slag, Calcium and magnesium status, Incubation period, Water contents",
author = "Khan, {Md Harunor Rashid} and Bhuiyan, {Md Mukaddas Ali} and Kabir, {Syed Monzur} and Blume, {Hans Peter} and Yoko Oki and Tadashi Adachi",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
day = "15",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "896--903",
journal = "Journal of Biological Sciences",
issn = "1727-3048",
publisher = "Asian Network for Scientific Information",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consequences of basic slag on soil pH, calcium and magnesium status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents

AU - Khan, Md Harunor Rashid

AU - Bhuiyan, Md Mukaddas Ali

AU - Kabir, Syed Monzur

AU - Blume, Hans Peter

AU - Oki, Yoko

AU - Adachi, Tadashi

PY - 2007/8/15

Y1 - 2007/8/15

N2 - Consequences of Basic Slag (BS) on soil pH, Ca and Mg status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents were studied for 30 months. The four doses of BS at the rates of 0, 10, 20 and 30 t ha-1 and three levels of water contents such as: (a) moisture at field capacity (50% water), (b) moisture at saturated condition (100% water) and (c) wetting-drying cycle (from saturation versus field capacity) were considered for this incubation study. Basic slag at 30 t ha-1 was found to be the best dose in order of the increment in soil pH, followed by the lower doses of BS20>BS10. The BS30 treatment increased the soil pH values by about 1.0, 1.5 and 1.2 units more compared with the control in the Sarisabari soil and 2.0, 1.7 and 1.5 units more in the Purbapukuria soil under the conditions of field capacity, saturated and wetting-drying cycle, respectively. Apart from the water contents and soil conditions, the values of soil pH were also increased significantly (p≤0.05) at different periods of incubation compared with the control. Like soil pH, almost similar to and significant (p≤0.05) increased levels of Ca and Mg were determined in both the soils; regardless of water contents and incubation time. The striking changes were recorded for the rate of increments of Ca and Mg, which were 4 to 5 times higher for Ca and more than 2 times higher for Mg compared with the control after 2 months of incubation. These results suggest that the application of basic slag not only increased the Ca to the higher amount than the increment of Mg in the soils but also improved one of the important criteria of imbalance between Ca and Mg status in the soils.

AB - Consequences of Basic Slag (BS) on soil pH, Ca and Mg status in acid sulfate soils under various water contents were studied for 30 months. The four doses of BS at the rates of 0, 10, 20 and 30 t ha-1 and three levels of water contents such as: (a) moisture at field capacity (50% water), (b) moisture at saturated condition (100% water) and (c) wetting-drying cycle (from saturation versus field capacity) were considered for this incubation study. Basic slag at 30 t ha-1 was found to be the best dose in order of the increment in soil pH, followed by the lower doses of BS20>BS10. The BS30 treatment increased the soil pH values by about 1.0, 1.5 and 1.2 units more compared with the control in the Sarisabari soil and 2.0, 1.7 and 1.5 units more in the Purbapukuria soil under the conditions of field capacity, saturated and wetting-drying cycle, respectively. Apart from the water contents and soil conditions, the values of soil pH were also increased significantly (p≤0.05) at different periods of incubation compared with the control. Like soil pH, almost similar to and significant (p≤0.05) increased levels of Ca and Mg were determined in both the soils; regardless of water contents and incubation time. The striking changes were recorded for the rate of increments of Ca and Mg, which were 4 to 5 times higher for Ca and more than 2 times higher for Mg compared with the control after 2 months of incubation. These results suggest that the application of basic slag not only increased the Ca to the higher amount than the increment of Mg in the soils but also improved one of the important criteria of imbalance between Ca and Mg status in the soils.

KW - Acid sulfate soils

KW - Basic slag

KW - Calcium and magnesium status

KW - Incubation period

KW - Water contents

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34948814630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34948814630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:34948814630

VL - 7

SP - 896

EP - 903

JO - Journal of Biological Sciences

JF - Journal of Biological Sciences

SN - 1727-3048

IS - 6

ER -