Concordance of strabismic phenotypes in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births

Toshihiko Matsuo, Mizue Hayashi, Hirotake Fujiwara, Takashi Yamane, Hiroshi Ohtsuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The concordance of strabismic phenotypes was examined in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births to study the role of genetic background in different types of comitant strabismus. Methods: Medical charts of 45 consecutive pairs of twins (16 monozygotic and 18 dizygotic twins, and 11 with unknown zygosity), 3 sets of triplets (one monozygotic and 2 trizygotic triplets), and one set of quadruzygotic quadruplets examined at 6 institutions between 1973 and 1999 were reviewed retrospectively. The concordance was defined as both or all members having either esotropia or exotropia in common. Results: The concordance of strabismic phenotypes was noted in 33 of 49 pairs or sets (67.3%): 14 of 17 monozygotic twins or triplets (82.4%), 10 of 21 multizygotic twins, triplets, or quadruplets (47.6%), and 9 of 11 twins with unknown zygosity (81.8%). The concordance rate was significantly higher in monozygosity than in multizygosity (P = .043, Fisher exact probability test). The predominant concordant phenotypes in monozygosity were accommodative esotropia and intermittent exotropia. Conclusion: A high concordance rate of strabismic phenotypes, predominantly of accommodative esotropia and intermittent exotropia in monozygosity, suggests the genetic background for these types of strabismus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-64
Number of pages6
JournalJapanese Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Multiple Birth Offspring
Exotropia
Esotropia
Phenotype
Monozygotic Twins
Strabismus
Dizygotic Twins
Genetic Background

Keywords

  • Esotropia
  • Exotropia
  • Multiple births
  • Strabismus
  • Twin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Concordance of strabismic phenotypes in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births. / Matsuo, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Mizue; Fujiwara, Hirotake; Yamane, Takashi; Ohtsuki, Hiroshi.

In: Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 46, No. 1, 2002, p. 59-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsuo, Toshihiko ; Hayashi, Mizue ; Fujiwara, Hirotake ; Yamane, Takashi ; Ohtsuki, Hiroshi. / Concordance of strabismic phenotypes in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births. In: Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology. 2002 ; Vol. 46, No. 1. pp. 59-64.
@article{5ca8aed3a1d64db5a97246f38a2eb66e,
title = "Concordance of strabismic phenotypes in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births",
abstract = "Purpose: The concordance of strabismic phenotypes was examined in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births to study the role of genetic background in different types of comitant strabismus. Methods: Medical charts of 45 consecutive pairs of twins (16 monozygotic and 18 dizygotic twins, and 11 with unknown zygosity), 3 sets of triplets (one monozygotic and 2 trizygotic triplets), and one set of quadruzygotic quadruplets examined at 6 institutions between 1973 and 1999 were reviewed retrospectively. The concordance was defined as both or all members having either esotropia or exotropia in common. Results: The concordance of strabismic phenotypes was noted in 33 of 49 pairs or sets (67.3{\%}): 14 of 17 monozygotic twins or triplets (82.4{\%}), 10 of 21 multizygotic twins, triplets, or quadruplets (47.6{\%}), and 9 of 11 twins with unknown zygosity (81.8{\%}). The concordance rate was significantly higher in monozygosity than in multizygosity (P = .043, Fisher exact probability test). The predominant concordant phenotypes in monozygosity were accommodative esotropia and intermittent exotropia. Conclusion: A high concordance rate of strabismic phenotypes, predominantly of accommodative esotropia and intermittent exotropia in monozygosity, suggests the genetic background for these types of strabismus.",
keywords = "Esotropia, Exotropia, Multiple births, Strabismus, Twin",
author = "Toshihiko Matsuo and Mizue Hayashi and Hirotake Fujiwara and Takashi Yamane and Hiroshi Ohtsuki",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1016/S0021-5155(01)00465-8",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "59--64",
journal = "Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0021-5155",
publisher = "Springer Japan",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Concordance of strabismic phenotypes in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births

AU - Matsuo, Toshihiko

AU - Hayashi, Mizue

AU - Fujiwara, Hirotake

AU - Yamane, Takashi

AU - Ohtsuki, Hiroshi

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Purpose: The concordance of strabismic phenotypes was examined in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births to study the role of genetic background in different types of comitant strabismus. Methods: Medical charts of 45 consecutive pairs of twins (16 monozygotic and 18 dizygotic twins, and 11 with unknown zygosity), 3 sets of triplets (one monozygotic and 2 trizygotic triplets), and one set of quadruzygotic quadruplets examined at 6 institutions between 1973 and 1999 were reviewed retrospectively. The concordance was defined as both or all members having either esotropia or exotropia in common. Results: The concordance of strabismic phenotypes was noted in 33 of 49 pairs or sets (67.3%): 14 of 17 monozygotic twins or triplets (82.4%), 10 of 21 multizygotic twins, triplets, or quadruplets (47.6%), and 9 of 11 twins with unknown zygosity (81.8%). The concordance rate was significantly higher in monozygosity than in multizygosity (P = .043, Fisher exact probability test). The predominant concordant phenotypes in monozygosity were accommodative esotropia and intermittent exotropia. Conclusion: A high concordance rate of strabismic phenotypes, predominantly of accommodative esotropia and intermittent exotropia in monozygosity, suggests the genetic background for these types of strabismus.

AB - Purpose: The concordance of strabismic phenotypes was examined in monozygotic versus multizygotic twins and other multiple births to study the role of genetic background in different types of comitant strabismus. Methods: Medical charts of 45 consecutive pairs of twins (16 monozygotic and 18 dizygotic twins, and 11 with unknown zygosity), 3 sets of triplets (one monozygotic and 2 trizygotic triplets), and one set of quadruzygotic quadruplets examined at 6 institutions between 1973 and 1999 were reviewed retrospectively. The concordance was defined as both or all members having either esotropia or exotropia in common. Results: The concordance of strabismic phenotypes was noted in 33 of 49 pairs or sets (67.3%): 14 of 17 monozygotic twins or triplets (82.4%), 10 of 21 multizygotic twins, triplets, or quadruplets (47.6%), and 9 of 11 twins with unknown zygosity (81.8%). The concordance rate was significantly higher in monozygosity than in multizygosity (P = .043, Fisher exact probability test). The predominant concordant phenotypes in monozygosity were accommodative esotropia and intermittent exotropia. Conclusion: A high concordance rate of strabismic phenotypes, predominantly of accommodative esotropia and intermittent exotropia in monozygosity, suggests the genetic background for these types of strabismus.

KW - Esotropia

KW - Exotropia

KW - Multiple births

KW - Strabismus

KW - Twin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036190427&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036190427&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0021-5155(01)00465-8

DO - 10.1016/S0021-5155(01)00465-8

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 59

EP - 64

JO - Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0021-5155

IS - 1

ER -