Comparison of stand dynamics after dieback caused by pine wilt disease among pine forests with different management regimes in western Japan

Keiji Sakamoto, Naoko Miki, Taiyo Tsuzuki, Takashi Nishimoto, Ken Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In pine forests damaged by pine wilt disease, in western Japan, the effect of protection regimes of pine trees on the stand dynamics were examined in the following four stands: (1) lightly damaged stand (age 30-40 years) with no procedure in operation for protecting pine trees; (2) severely damaged stand (age 30-40 years) with no procedure in place for protecting pine trees; (3) severely damaged stand (age 50 years) with a selective cutting of infected trees; (4) severely damaged stand (age 30-40 years) with a selective cutting of infected trees. All the stands had been abandoned before the pine wilt disease damage. The understory structure of the severely damaged stand with no protection procedure was similar to that of the lightly damaged stand. Frequent invasion by tree species and acceleration in the growth of understory trees occurred after the dieback in the selective cutting stand. These results suggest that a deficiency in the canopy layer caused by the dieback resulted in low disturbance intensity in the early stages after the die-back, but the selective cutting increased the intensity by the reduction in the understory as well as the canopy layer. The intensity of the disturbance in the selective cutting stands was larger in the younger stand because it had a higher density of selectively cut pine trees. The different stand structure of pine forests occurred after the dieback because the intensity of the disturbance varied as a result of the selective cutting operation and the stand age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-309
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Forest Research
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2003

Keywords

  • Dieback
  • Pine forest
  • Pine wilt disease
  • Pinus densiflora
  • Stand dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry

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