Comparison of equilibrium and transient responses to CO2 increase in eight state-of-the-art climate models

Tokuta Yokohata, Seita Emori, Toru Nozawa, Tomoo Ogura, Michio Kawamiya, Yoko Tsushima, Tatsuo Suzuki, Seiji Yukimoto, Ayako Abe-ouchi, Hiroyasu Hasumi, Akimasa Sumi, Masahude Kimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the climate response of doubled CO2 equilibrium experiments (2 × CO2) by atmosphere-slab ocean coupled general circulation models (ASGCMs) and that of 1% per year CO2 increase experiments (1%CO2 by atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation models (AOGCMs) using eight state-of-the-art climate models. Climate feedback processes in 2 × CO2 are different from those in 1%CO2, and the equilibrium climate sensitivity (T) in 2 × CO2 is different from the effective climate sensitivity (T2×,eff) in 1%CO2. The difference between T and T2×,eff is from -1.3 to 1.6 K, a large part of which can be explained by the difference in the ice-albedo and cloud feedback. The largest contribution is cloud SW feedback, and the difference in cloud SW feedback for 2 × CO2 and 1%CO2 could be determined by the distribution of the SAT anomaly which causes differences in the atmospheric thermal structure. An important factor which determines the difference in ice-albedo feedback is the initial sea ice distribution at the Southern Ocean, which is generally overestimated in 2 ×CO2 as compared to 1%CO2 and observation. Through the comparison of climate feedback processes in 2 × CO2 and 1%CO2, the possible behaviour of the time evolution of T2×,eff is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)946-961
Number of pages16
JournalTellus, Series A: Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

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climate feedback
climate modeling
albedo
general circulation model
climate
ocean
ice
atmosphere
thermal structure
sea ice
slab
experiment
anomaly
comparison
state of the art
distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Oceanography

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Comparison of equilibrium and transient responses to CO2 increase in eight state-of-the-art climate models. / Yokohata, Tokuta; Emori, Seita; Nozawa, Toru; Ogura, Tomoo; Kawamiya, Michio; Tsushima, Yoko; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Yukimoto, Seiji; Abe-ouchi, Ayako; Hasumi, Hiroyasu; Sumi, Akimasa; Kimoto, Masahude.

In: Tellus, Series A: Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography, Vol. 60, No. 5, 2008, p. 946-961.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yokohata, T, Emori, S, Nozawa, T, Ogura, T, Kawamiya, M, Tsushima, Y, Suzuki, T, Yukimoto, S, Abe-ouchi, A, Hasumi, H, Sumi, A & Kimoto, M 2008, 'Comparison of equilibrium and transient responses to CO2 increase in eight state-of-the-art climate models', Tellus, Series A: Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography, vol. 60, no. 5, pp. 946-961. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0870.2008.00345.x
Yokohata, Tokuta ; Emori, Seita ; Nozawa, Toru ; Ogura, Tomoo ; Kawamiya, Michio ; Tsushima, Yoko ; Suzuki, Tatsuo ; Yukimoto, Seiji ; Abe-ouchi, Ayako ; Hasumi, Hiroyasu ; Sumi, Akimasa ; Kimoto, Masahude. / Comparison of equilibrium and transient responses to CO2 increase in eight state-of-the-art climate models. In: Tellus, Series A: Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography. 2008 ; Vol. 60, No. 5. pp. 946-961.
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