Comparative transcriptomics with self-organizing map reveals cryptic photosynthetic differences between two accessions of North American Lake cress

Hokuto Nakayama, Tomoaki Sakamoto, Yuki Okegawa, Kaori Kaminoyama, Manabu Fujie, Yasunori Ichihashi, Tetsuya Kurata, Ken Motohashi, Ihsan Al-Shehbaz, Neelima Sinha, Seisuke Kimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because natural variation in wild species is likely the result of local adaptation, it provides a valuable resource for understanding plant-environmental interactions. Rorippa aquatica (Brassicaceae) is a semi-aquatic North American plant with morphological differences between several accessions, but little information available on any physiological differences. Here, we surveyed the transcriptomes of two R. aquatica accessions and identified cryptic physiological differences between them. We first reconstructed a Rorippa phylogeny to confirm relationships between the accessions. We performed large-scale RNA-seq and de novo assembly; the resulting 87,754 unigenes were then annotated via comparisons to different databases. Between-accession physiological variation was identified with transcriptomes from both accessions. Transcriptome data were analyzed with principal component analysis and self-organizing map. Results of analyses suggested that photosynthetic capability differs between the accessions. Indeed, physiological experiments revealed between-accession variation in electron transport rate and the redox state of the plastoquinone pool. These results indicated that one accession may have adapted to differences in temperature or length of the growing season.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3302
JournalScientific reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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