Combined therapy of deoxyspergualin and plasmapheresis: A useful treatment for antibody-mediated acute rejection after kidney transplantation

M. Nojima, T. Yoshimoto, Atsunori Nakao, T. Maruyama, H. Takiuchi, M. Izumi, M. Hashimoto, M. Kyo, H. Shima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Antibody-mediated acute rejection (AbAR) is one of the primary causes of graft impairment in kidney transplant recipients. Deoxyspergualin (DSG), which displays an antiproliferative action against antigen-stimulated B cells inhibiting antibody production, may be effective to rescue AbAR in combination with plasmapheresis by suppressing antibody production and elimination. In the present study, we report our experience with DSG/plasmapheresis therapy for the treatment of AbAR. Five kidney transplant patients experienced a steroid-resistant acute rejection requiring dialysis followed by an AbAR that was confirmed by biopsy and flow cytometry crossmatch (FCXM) results. DSG was administration at 3 mg/kg per day for 10 days with plasmapheresis reduce antidonor antibody. Treatment outcome, effectiveness, and adverse events were examined; in two cases sequential FCXM examinations were performed to evaluate antibody status. All five patients received DSG/plasmapheresis therapy. The number of plasmapheresis treatments ranged from 1 to 9 according to treatment outcomes. Four patients recovered graft function following treatment; whereas one showed no response to the treatment, and the graft was lost. No serious side effects or infections were observed during or after treatment. Monitoring of sequential FCXM correlated with the clinical course. AbAR shows a worse prognosis than cellular rejection. It is refractory to conventional antirejection therapy. In the present study, DSG/plasmapheresis therapy was effective in four of five patients (80%) with AbAR. It may be considered the first choice of treatment for cases of acute humoral rejection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)930-933
Number of pages4
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Plasmapheresis
Kidney Transplantation
Antibodies
Transplants
Therapeutics
Antibody Formation
Kidney
gusperimus
Immunosuppression
Dialysis
Flow Cytometry
B-Lymphocytes
Steroids
Biopsy
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Combined therapy of deoxyspergualin and plasmapheresis : A useful treatment for antibody-mediated acute rejection after kidney transplantation. / Nojima, M.; Yoshimoto, T.; Nakao, Atsunori; Maruyama, T.; Takiuchi, H.; Izumi, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Kyo, M.; Shima, H.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 37, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 930-933.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nojima, M. ; Yoshimoto, T. ; Nakao, Atsunori ; Maruyama, T. ; Takiuchi, H. ; Izumi, M. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Kyo, M. ; Shima, H. / Combined therapy of deoxyspergualin and plasmapheresis : A useful treatment for antibody-mediated acute rejection after kidney transplantation. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2005 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 930-933.
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