Combination chemotherapy of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and vindesine plus concurrent hyperfractionated thoracic radiotherapy for treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

Keisuke Aoe, Hiroshi Ueoka, Katsuyuki Kiura, Masahiro Tabata, Takuo Shibayama, Yoshihiko Segawa, Haruhito Kamei, Katsuyoshi Sakae, Yoshio Hiraki, Mine Harada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Between June 1993 and May 1994, Ten patients with locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with a combination chemotherapy plus concurrent hyperfractionated thoracic radiotherapy. The chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil (500mg/m given on day 1-5), cisplatin (20mg/m given on day 1-5), and vindesine (3mg/m given on day 1, 8), and was repeated with a four-week interval through 3 cycles. The thoracic radiotherapy (1.25 Gy/fraction) was given twice daily for 5 consecutive days per week for 5-6 weeks, reaching a total dose of 62.5-70 Gy. An objective respose rate was 80% and a median survival time was 17.3 months. Although non-hematologicic toxicities were generally mild and tolerable, hématologie toxicities were severe and inevitable with severe neutopenia (WHO grade 3 or 4) being observed in all patients. We stopped this trial because of its severe hématologie toxicity after ten patients were evaluated. However, this combined modality treatment was highly effective for locally advanced NSCLC. Some change in the chemotherapy regimen, such as dose attenuation to reduce the hématologie toxicity, will be necessary to accomplish this treatment modality as a multi-institutional study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-193
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Research, Therapy and Control
Volume10
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Combination chemotherapy of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and vindesine plus concurrent hyperfractionated thoracic radiotherapy for treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this