Colonization of vegetation-rich moraines and inference of multiple sources of colonization in the High Arctic for Salix arctica

Makiko Mimura, Akira S. Mori, Masaki Uchida, Hiroshi Kanda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vegetation-rich patches in the High Arctic may serve as a significant source for vegetation reconstruction in the climate changes. Diversity and colonization, however, of such potential source populations in the High Arctic has rarely been studied. We examined chloroplast sequence variation in Salix arctica, a key species in the Canadian High Arctic, from four adjacent glacial moraines of differing ages on Ellesmere Island, Canada, as well as two other populations located at the center and southern end of the species' range. The estimated ages of the moraines varied from 35,000 to 250 years old. The older moraine populations showed higher within-population genetic variation compared with the other moraine populations, which is generally attributed to differences in establishment age associated with plant densities among moraines. The moraines with smaller plant density had lower genetic diversity and had no private haplotypes, indicating the local population size and genetic diversity may not be recovered within a few thousand years. This suggests seed dispersal at a local scale may be limited even in species with high velocity of seed dispersal, and that High Arctic vegetation-rich patches may serve as significant source populations for sustaining local genetic diversity. In addition, the three regions we observed comprised an evolutionarily distinct lineage and significant population differentiation. This implies multiple sources for the colonization during the most recent deglaciation, resulting in the current wide distribution. Local as well as range-wide processes of colonization would be essential to understand vegetation responses in High Arctic to the environmental changes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-229
Number of pages7
JournalConservation Genetics
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Salix
Arctica (Arcticidae)
Arctic region
colonization
vegetation
moraine
seed dispersal
Seed Dispersal
population genetics
Population
genetic variation
Population Genetics
plant density
deglaciation
chloroplast
population size
environmental change
Climate Change
Chloroplasts
Population Density

Keywords

  • Genetic diversity
  • Loss of genetic diversity
  • Phylogeography
  • Polar oasis
  • Refugia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Colonization of vegetation-rich moraines and inference of multiple sources of colonization in the High Arctic for Salix arctica. / Mimura, Makiko; Mori, Akira S.; Uchida, Masaki; Kanda, Hiroshi.

In: Conservation Genetics, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 223-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{449a4a42f3c74915a50e713b55f7ef5a,
title = "Colonization of vegetation-rich moraines and inference of multiple sources of colonization in the High Arctic for Salix arctica",
abstract = "Vegetation-rich patches in the High Arctic may serve as a significant source for vegetation reconstruction in the climate changes. Diversity and colonization, however, of such potential source populations in the High Arctic has rarely been studied. We examined chloroplast sequence variation in Salix arctica, a key species in the Canadian High Arctic, from four adjacent glacial moraines of differing ages on Ellesmere Island, Canada, as well as two other populations located at the center and southern end of the species' range. The estimated ages of the moraines varied from 35,000 to 250 years old. The older moraine populations showed higher within-population genetic variation compared with the other moraine populations, which is generally attributed to differences in establishment age associated with plant densities among moraines. The moraines with smaller plant density had lower genetic diversity and had no private haplotypes, indicating the local population size and genetic diversity may not be recovered within a few thousand years. This suggests seed dispersal at a local scale may be limited even in species with high velocity of seed dispersal, and that High Arctic vegetation-rich patches may serve as significant source populations for sustaining local genetic diversity. In addition, the three regions we observed comprised an evolutionarily distinct lineage and significant population differentiation. This implies multiple sources for the colonization during the most recent deglaciation, resulting in the current wide distribution. Local as well as range-wide processes of colonization would be essential to understand vegetation responses in High Arctic to the environmental changes.",
keywords = "Genetic diversity, Loss of genetic diversity, Phylogeography, Polar oasis, Refugia",
author = "Makiko Mimura and Mori, {Akira S.} and Masaki Uchida and Hiroshi Kanda",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10592-012-0413-3",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "223--229",
journal = "Conservation Genetics",
issn = "1566-0621",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Colonization of vegetation-rich moraines and inference of multiple sources of colonization in the High Arctic for Salix arctica

AU - Mimura, Makiko

AU - Mori, Akira S.

AU - Uchida, Masaki

AU - Kanda, Hiroshi

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Vegetation-rich patches in the High Arctic may serve as a significant source for vegetation reconstruction in the climate changes. Diversity and colonization, however, of such potential source populations in the High Arctic has rarely been studied. We examined chloroplast sequence variation in Salix arctica, a key species in the Canadian High Arctic, from four adjacent glacial moraines of differing ages on Ellesmere Island, Canada, as well as two other populations located at the center and southern end of the species' range. The estimated ages of the moraines varied from 35,000 to 250 years old. The older moraine populations showed higher within-population genetic variation compared with the other moraine populations, which is generally attributed to differences in establishment age associated with plant densities among moraines. The moraines with smaller plant density had lower genetic diversity and had no private haplotypes, indicating the local population size and genetic diversity may not be recovered within a few thousand years. This suggests seed dispersal at a local scale may be limited even in species with high velocity of seed dispersal, and that High Arctic vegetation-rich patches may serve as significant source populations for sustaining local genetic diversity. In addition, the three regions we observed comprised an evolutionarily distinct lineage and significant population differentiation. This implies multiple sources for the colonization during the most recent deglaciation, resulting in the current wide distribution. Local as well as range-wide processes of colonization would be essential to understand vegetation responses in High Arctic to the environmental changes.

AB - Vegetation-rich patches in the High Arctic may serve as a significant source for vegetation reconstruction in the climate changes. Diversity and colonization, however, of such potential source populations in the High Arctic has rarely been studied. We examined chloroplast sequence variation in Salix arctica, a key species in the Canadian High Arctic, from four adjacent glacial moraines of differing ages on Ellesmere Island, Canada, as well as two other populations located at the center and southern end of the species' range. The estimated ages of the moraines varied from 35,000 to 250 years old. The older moraine populations showed higher within-population genetic variation compared with the other moraine populations, which is generally attributed to differences in establishment age associated with plant densities among moraines. The moraines with smaller plant density had lower genetic diversity and had no private haplotypes, indicating the local population size and genetic diversity may not be recovered within a few thousand years. This suggests seed dispersal at a local scale may be limited even in species with high velocity of seed dispersal, and that High Arctic vegetation-rich patches may serve as significant source populations for sustaining local genetic diversity. In addition, the three regions we observed comprised an evolutionarily distinct lineage and significant population differentiation. This implies multiple sources for the colonization during the most recent deglaciation, resulting in the current wide distribution. Local as well as range-wide processes of colonization would be essential to understand vegetation responses in High Arctic to the environmental changes.

KW - Genetic diversity

KW - Loss of genetic diversity

KW - Phylogeography

KW - Polar oasis

KW - Refugia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84872841449&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84872841449&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10592-012-0413-3

DO - 10.1007/s10592-012-0413-3

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84872841449

VL - 14

SP - 223

EP - 229

JO - Conservation Genetics

JF - Conservation Genetics

SN - 1566-0621

IS - 1

ER -