Cognitive and affective functions in diabetic patients associated with diabetes-related factors, white matter abnormality and aging

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a decline in cognitive and affective functions. Methods: In all, 182 outpatients with DM were investigated for associations of cognitive and affective functions with diabetes-related factors and cerebral white matter abnormalities. In addition, the difference in cognitive decline of age-matched late elderly normal subjects and DM patients was investigated. Results: The present study revealed that cognitive and affective functions declined in some DM patients. Furthermore, the decline in these functions was unrelated to fasting blood sugar level but was related to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin resistance. Poor HbA1c control was associated with a significant decline in the 'calculation' subscale and insulin resistance for 'naming', 'read list of letters' and 'delayed recall' Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) subscale scores. Magnetic resonance imaging scans showed that both periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) and deep white matter hyperintensity were associated with Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and MoCA scores, but only PVH was related to homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance scores. Compared with age-matched late elderly normal subjects, 'orientation to time' and 'registration' MMSE subscales declined in late elderly DM patients. Conclusions: These results suggest that cognitive and affective decline in DM patients was mostly related to glucose control and insulin resistance, whilst amongst late elderly subjects the impairment of 'attention' and 'orientation' were characteristic features of DM patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-321
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

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Cognition
Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin Resistance
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
White Matter
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Homeostasis
Outpatients
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Glucose

Keywords

  • MRI
  • Cognitive and affective functions
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • HbA1c
  • Insulin resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Cognitive and affective functions in diabetic patients associated with diabetes-related factors, white matter abnormality and aging",
abstract = "Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a decline in cognitive and affective functions. Methods: In all, 182 outpatients with DM were investigated for associations of cognitive and affective functions with diabetes-related factors and cerebral white matter abnormalities. In addition, the difference in cognitive decline of age-matched late elderly normal subjects and DM patients was investigated. Results: The present study revealed that cognitive and affective functions declined in some DM patients. Furthermore, the decline in these functions was unrelated to fasting blood sugar level but was related to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin resistance. Poor HbA1c control was associated with a significant decline in the 'calculation' subscale and insulin resistance for 'naming', 'read list of letters' and 'delayed recall' Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) subscale scores. Magnetic resonance imaging scans showed that both periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) and deep white matter hyperintensity were associated with Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and MoCA scores, but only PVH was related to homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance scores. Compared with age-matched late elderly normal subjects, 'orientation to time' and 'registration' MMSE subscales declined in late elderly DM patients. Conclusions: These results suggest that cognitive and affective decline in DM patients was mostly related to glucose control and insulin resistance, whilst amongst late elderly subjects the impairment of 'attention' and 'orientation' were characteristic features of DM patients.",
keywords = "MRI, Cognitive and affective functions, Diabetes mellitus, HbA1c, Insulin resistance",
author = "Nozomi Hishikawa and Toru Yamashita and K. Deguchi and Jun Wada and Kenichi Shikata and Hirofumi Makino and Koji Abe",
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AU - Hishikawa, Nozomi

AU - Yamashita, Toru

AU - Deguchi, K.

AU - Wada, Jun

AU - Shikata, Kenichi

AU - Makino, Hirofumi

AU - Abe, Koji

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N2 - Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a decline in cognitive and affective functions. Methods: In all, 182 outpatients with DM were investigated for associations of cognitive and affective functions with diabetes-related factors and cerebral white matter abnormalities. In addition, the difference in cognitive decline of age-matched late elderly normal subjects and DM patients was investigated. Results: The present study revealed that cognitive and affective functions declined in some DM patients. Furthermore, the decline in these functions was unrelated to fasting blood sugar level but was related to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin resistance. Poor HbA1c control was associated with a significant decline in the 'calculation' subscale and insulin resistance for 'naming', 'read list of letters' and 'delayed recall' Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) subscale scores. Magnetic resonance imaging scans showed that both periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) and deep white matter hyperintensity were associated with Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and MoCA scores, but only PVH was related to homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance scores. Compared with age-matched late elderly normal subjects, 'orientation to time' and 'registration' MMSE subscales declined in late elderly DM patients. Conclusions: These results suggest that cognitive and affective decline in DM patients was mostly related to glucose control and insulin resistance, whilst amongst late elderly subjects the impairment of 'attention' and 'orientation' were characteristic features of DM patients.

AB - Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a decline in cognitive and affective functions. Methods: In all, 182 outpatients with DM were investigated for associations of cognitive and affective functions with diabetes-related factors and cerebral white matter abnormalities. In addition, the difference in cognitive decline of age-matched late elderly normal subjects and DM patients was investigated. Results: The present study revealed that cognitive and affective functions declined in some DM patients. Furthermore, the decline in these functions was unrelated to fasting blood sugar level but was related to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin resistance. Poor HbA1c control was associated with a significant decline in the 'calculation' subscale and insulin resistance for 'naming', 'read list of letters' and 'delayed recall' Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) subscale scores. Magnetic resonance imaging scans showed that both periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) and deep white matter hyperintensity were associated with Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and MoCA scores, but only PVH was related to homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance scores. Compared with age-matched late elderly normal subjects, 'orientation to time' and 'registration' MMSE subscales declined in late elderly DM patients. Conclusions: These results suggest that cognitive and affective decline in DM patients was mostly related to glucose control and insulin resistance, whilst amongst late elderly subjects the impairment of 'attention' and 'orientation' were characteristic features of DM patients.

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