Clinical Significance of Serum Soluble TNF Receptor I/II Ratio for the Differential Diagnosis of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome From Other Autoinflammatory Diseases

Junko Yasumura, Masaki Shimizu, Tomoko Toma, Masato Yashiro, Akihiro Yachie, Satoshi Okada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Genetic analysis of TNFRSF1A can confirm the diagnosis of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), but interpretation of the pathogenesis of variants of unknown significance is sometimes required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of serum soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type I (sTNFR-I)/II ratio to differentiate TRAPS from other autoinflammatory diseases. Methods: Serum sTNFR-I and sTNFR-II levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients with TRAPS (n = 5), familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) (n = 14), systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) (n = 90), and Kawasaki disease (KD) (n = 37) in the active and inactive phase, along with healthy controls (HCs) (n = 18). Results: In the active phase, the serum sTNFR-I/II ratio in patients with s-JIA, KD, and FMF was significantly elevated compared with that in HCs, whereas it was not elevated in patients with TRAPS. In the inactive phase, the serum sTNFR-I/II ratio in patients with s-JIA and FMF was significantly higher compared with that in HCs, and the ratio was lower in TRAPS patients than in patients with s-JIA and FMF. Conclusions: Low serum sTNFR-I/II ratio in the active and inactive phase might be useful for the differential diagnosis of TRAPS and other autoinflammatory diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Article number576152
JournalFrontiers in immunology
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 14 2020

Keywords

  • Kawasaki disease (KD)
  • familial Mediterranean fever
  • soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor
  • systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA)
  • tumor necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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