Clinical Parameters Reflecting Globe/orbit Volume Imbalances in Japanese Acquired Esotropia Patients with High Myopia but without Abduction Limitations

Reika Kono, Ichiro Hamasaki, Fumiko Kishimoto, Hiroshi Ohtuski, Kiyo Shibata, Yuki Morizane, Fumio Shiraga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In high myopia, eye dislocation due to increased globe volume or tight orbital volume causes acquired esotropia. GOR (globe/orbit volume ratio), an indicator of the degree of progression of this pathology, was investigated the relationships among easily obtained clinical parameters. In this retrospective study, 20 eyes from 10 acquired esotropia patients with high myopia but without abduction limitations were examined. The mean age of the patients was 63.7±8.2 years (mean±standard deviation). Volumes were measured on the three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition magnetic resonance imaging images using the volume-measurement function. Correlations between GOR and the displacement angle of the globe (DA), axial length (AL), and equatorial diameter (ED) were investigated. Mean DA, AL, ED, and GOR values were 107.5±8.5°, 28.86±1.92 mm, 25.00±1.16 mm, and 0.36±0.05, respectively. Only AL was correlated with GOR (p<0.0001, R2=0.6649); DA (p=0.30, R2=0.0633) and ED (p=0.91, R2=0.0008) were not. AL was the only clinically available parameter to indicate globe/orbit volume imbalances in acquired esotropia with high myopia but without abduction limitation. AL may be important for the clinical assessment of the progression of this pathology

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-453
Number of pages7
JournalActa medica Okayama
Volume75
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • acquired esotropia
  • globe volume
  • high myopia (high myopes)
  • limitation of abduction
  • magnetic resonance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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