Clinical manifestations of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in Japan from the Japan Renal Biopsy Registry: age stratification and comparison with minimal change disease

Takaya Ozeki, Shoichi Maruyama, Toshiyuki Imasawa, Takehiko Kawaguchi, Hiroshi Kitamura, Moritoshi Kadomura, Ritsuko Katafuchi, Kazumasa Oka, Hitoshi Yokoyama, Hitoshi Sugiyama, Hiroshi Sato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a serious condition leading to kidney failure. We aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics of FSGS and its differences compared with minimal change disease (MCD) using cross-sectional data from the Japan Renal Biopsy Registry. In Analysis 1, primary FSGS (n = 996) were stratified by age into three groups: pediatric (< 18 years), adult (18–64 years), and elderly (≥ 65 years), and clinical characteristics were compared. Clinical diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome (NS) was given to 73.5% (97/132) of the pediatric, 41.2% (256/622) of the adult, and 65.7% (159/242) of the elderly group. In Analysis 2, primary FSGS (n = 306) and MCD (n = 1303) whose clinical diagnosis was nephrotic syndrome (NS) and laboratory data were consistent with NS, were enrolled. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to elucidate the variables which can distinguish FSGS from MCD. On multivariable analysis, higher systolic blood pressure, higher serum albumin, lower eGFR, and presence of hematuria associated with FSGS. In Japanese nationwide registry, primary FSGS patients aged 18–64 years showed lower rate of NS than those in other ages. Among primary nephrotic cases, FSGS showed distinct clinical features from MCD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2602
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical manifestations of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in Japan from the Japan Renal Biopsy Registry: age stratification and comparison with minimal change disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this