Cleavage and survival of xenopus embryos exposed to 8 T static magnetic fields in a rotating clinostat

Yawara Eguchi, Shoogo Ueno, Chikara Kaito, Kazuhisa Sekimizu, Koichiro Shiokawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we examined cleavage and survival of fertilized Xenopus embryos exposed to 8 T static magnetic fields (SMFs). We investigated fertilized Xenopus embryos exposed to magnetic field either in static chamber or in a rotating culture system. Our results showed that the exposure to the strong magnetic field of 8 T changed the third cleavage furrow from the usual horizontal one to a perpendicular one; however, when the direction of gravity was randomized by exposing embryos to magnetic field in a rotating culture system, the third cleavage furrow were formed horizontally, a finding which suggests that the observed distortion of the third cleavage furrow in magnetism-exposed embryos was accomplished by altering gravity effects which were elicited by diamagnetic force due to high gradient magnetic field. Our results also showed that the exposure to the strong magnetic field did lot damage survival. These results demonstrate that SMF and altering gravity cause distortion of the third cleavage furrow and show that effects of exposing cleavage embryos to magnetic field were transient and did not affect the post-cleavage development. We also showed that strong magnetic field is not hazardous to the cleavage and blastula-gastrula transition of developing embryonic cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-313
Number of pages7
JournalBioelectromagnetics
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • DC magnetic field
  • Gravity
  • Rotating culture
  • Xenopus fertilized eggs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Physiology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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