Characteristics of sugar surfactants in stabilizing proteins during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying

Koreyoshi Imamura, Katsuyuki Murai, Tamayo Korehisa, Noriyuki Shimizu, Ryo Yamahira, Tsutashi Matsuura, Hiroko Tada, Hiroyuki Imanaka, Naoyuki Ishida, Kazuhiro Nakanishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sugar surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths and sugar head groups were compared for their protein-stabilizing effect during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. Six enzymes, different in terms of tolerance against inactivation because of freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, were used as model proteins. The enzyme activities that remained after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying in the presence of a sugar surfactant were measured for different types and concentrations of sugar surfactants. Sugar surfactants stabilized all of the tested enzymes both during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, and a one or two order higher amount of added sugar surfactant was required for achieving protein stabilization during freeze-drying than for the cryoprotection. The comprehensive comparison showed that the C10-C12 esters of sucrose or trehalose were the most effective through the freeze-drying process: the remaining enzyme activities after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying increased at the sugar ester concentrations of 1-10 and 10-100 μM, respectively, and increased to a greater extent than for the other surfactants at higher concentrations. Results also indicate that, when a decent amount of sugar was also added, the protein-stabilizing effect of a small amount of sugar ester through the freeze-drying process could be enhanced.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1628-1637
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Volume103
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Freeze Drying
Surface-Active Agents
Proteins
Esters
Enzymes
Trehalose
Sucrose
Head

Keywords

  • enzymes
  • freeze-drying
  • freeze-thawing
  • freeze-tolerance
  • interaction
  • stabilization
  • sugar surfactant
  • surfactants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Characteristics of sugar surfactants in stabilizing proteins during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. / Imamura, Koreyoshi; Murai, Katsuyuki; Korehisa, Tamayo; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Yamahira, Ryo; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Tada, Hiroko; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro.

In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 103, No. 6, 2014, p. 1628-1637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Imamura, Koreyoshi ; Murai, Katsuyuki ; Korehisa, Tamayo ; Shimizu, Noriyuki ; Yamahira, Ryo ; Matsuura, Tsutashi ; Tada, Hiroko ; Imanaka, Hiroyuki ; Ishida, Naoyuki ; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro. / Characteristics of sugar surfactants in stabilizing proteins during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2014 ; Vol. 103, No. 6. pp. 1628-1637.
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