Changes in splenic volume after partial splenic embolization in children

Yasuhiro Watanabe, Takuji Todani, Takuo Noda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The authors studied changes in splenic volume after partial splenic embolization (PSE) in children who bad thrombocytopenia caused by splenomegaly. Materials and Methods: Five children with hypersplenism (ages of 1, 6, 7, 10, and 14 years) underwent PSE. The follow-up period ranged from 1 month to 8 years g months. Whole and infarcted splenic volumes were measured from computed tomography images obtained before and after PSE. Results: Within 2 weeks after PSE, the whole splenic volume increased to 110% to 140% of the pre-PSE volume. The infarcted area disappeared 3 to 4 months after PSE, and the whole splenic volume decreased markedly. The decreased volume tended to be stable during the follow-up period. The splenic enlargement before PSE ranged from 7.2 to 14.2 times the standard splenic volume for a corresponding body weight. The splenic volume did not become normal after PSE; it remained between 2 and 7 times larger than standard. Platelet counts stayed above 10 x 104/mm3 when the splenic volume reduced to 2 times the standard volume. Conclusion: The first 4 weeks after PSE is the most dangerous period for the development of splenic rupture because of marked expansion of the splenic capsule. The infarcted parenchyma is absorbed 3 to 4 months after PSE, and the whole splenic volume is reduced. Thereafter, the splenic volume is stable for several years. Reembolization is not likely to be necessary in the majority of patients who have bad splenic embolization with an infarction rate of ≥80%.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-244
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Partial splenic embolization
  • hypersplenism
  • splenic volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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