Changes in efficiencies and interactions of attentional networks in Parkinson's disease with sleep disturbance

Yanna Ren, Keisuke Suzuki, Koichi Hirata, Weiping Yang, Jinglong Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Attention is composed of three distinct attentional networks: alerting, orienting, and executive control. Previous studies have confirmed that Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with executive control deficits; however, the interactions among the three attentional networks and the influence of sleep disturbance in PD patients have not been investigated. Herein, the efficiencies for the three attentional networks and their interactions were evaluated using the revised attention network test. The results showed a significantly slower response and lower accuracy in the PD group than in the normal control group and a significantly slower response and lower accuracy in PD patients with sleep disturbance (PDS) than in PD patients without sleep disturbance (PDnS), which indicates a response deficit in PD and worsening in PDS. Additionally, the executive control efficiency was reduced in both PDS and PDnS, and significantly higher alerting efficiency and lower orienting efficiency were found in PDS. Furthermore, largely changed interactions and correlation patterns of attentional networks were found in PDS but not in PDnS. These results suggested that attentional networks were impaired in PD patients, particularly in those affected by sleep disturbances, and that PDS might establish special connections between attentional networks to compensate for cognitive dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)236-244
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroscience Research
Volume170
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Alerting
  • Attention
  • Executive control
  • Orienting
  • Parkinson's disease (PD)
  • Sleep disturbance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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