Changes in crown architecture with tree height in two deciduous tree species

Developmental constraints or plastic response to the competition for light?

Noriyuki Osada, Ryunosuke Tateno, Fujio Hyodo, Hiroshi Takeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the crown architecture of two canopy species, Fagus crenata Blume, which is highly shade tolerant, and Quercus crispula Blume, which is less shade tolerant, in upper and lower positions on a slope in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effects of the competitive position for the light environment and developmental constraints on the crown architecture of two species that have different degrees of shade tolerance. In both species, the maximum attainable height was smaller on the upper slope than on the lower slope. The light environment brightened with increasing tree height. Trees in similar competitive position and thus similar light environments were shorter on the upper slope than on the lower slope. When we considered tree height relative to the maximum attainable height, the difference between the upper and lower slopes in the relationship of competitive position to tree height disappeared. Thus, relative tree height was a good index of the competitive position for the light environment when the trees of both slope positions were pooled. The relationships of crown depth and width to relative tree height differed between trees on the upper and lower slopes, while the relationships of crown depth and width to actual tree height were similar. This suggests that developmental constraints are more important than the competitive position in determining the crown architecture of the two species. However, variation in crown architecture was greater in Q. crispula than in F. crenata, probably because of the difference in shade tolerance between the two species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-347
Number of pages11
JournalForest Ecology and Management
Volume188
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 5 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

canopy architecture
deciduous tree
tree crown
plastics
plastic
Quercus mongolica
Fagus crenata
shade tolerance
shade
temperate forests
temperate forest
canopy
Japan

Keywords

  • Crown depth
  • Crown width
  • Fagus crenata
  • Maximum height
  • Quercus crispula

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Forestry
  • Ecology

Cite this

Changes in crown architecture with tree height in two deciduous tree species : Developmental constraints or plastic response to the competition for light? / Osada, Noriyuki; Tateno, Ryunosuke; Hyodo, Fujio; Takeda, Hiroshi.

In: Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 188, No. 1-3, 05.02.2004, p. 337-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f887d2800bb74ff4bdad586501d81891,
title = "Changes in crown architecture with tree height in two deciduous tree species: Developmental constraints or plastic response to the competition for light?",
abstract = "We examined the crown architecture of two canopy species, Fagus crenata Blume, which is highly shade tolerant, and Quercus crispula Blume, which is less shade tolerant, in upper and lower positions on a slope in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effects of the competitive position for the light environment and developmental constraints on the crown architecture of two species that have different degrees of shade tolerance. In both species, the maximum attainable height was smaller on the upper slope than on the lower slope. The light environment brightened with increasing tree height. Trees in similar competitive position and thus similar light environments were shorter on the upper slope than on the lower slope. When we considered tree height relative to the maximum attainable height, the difference between the upper and lower slopes in the relationship of competitive position to tree height disappeared. Thus, relative tree height was a good index of the competitive position for the light environment when the trees of both slope positions were pooled. The relationships of crown depth and width to relative tree height differed between trees on the upper and lower slopes, while the relationships of crown depth and width to actual tree height were similar. This suggests that developmental constraints are more important than the competitive position in determining the crown architecture of the two species. However, variation in crown architecture was greater in Q. crispula than in F. crenata, probably because of the difference in shade tolerance between the two species.",
keywords = "Crown depth, Crown width, Fagus crenata, Maximum height, Quercus crispula",
author = "Noriyuki Osada and Ryunosuke Tateno and Fujio Hyodo and Hiroshi Takeda",
year = "2004",
month = "2",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.foreco.2003.08.003",
language = "English",
volume = "188",
pages = "337--347",
journal = "Forest Ecology and Management",
issn = "0378-1127",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in crown architecture with tree height in two deciduous tree species

T2 - Developmental constraints or plastic response to the competition for light?

AU - Osada, Noriyuki

AU - Tateno, Ryunosuke

AU - Hyodo, Fujio

AU - Takeda, Hiroshi

PY - 2004/2/5

Y1 - 2004/2/5

N2 - We examined the crown architecture of two canopy species, Fagus crenata Blume, which is highly shade tolerant, and Quercus crispula Blume, which is less shade tolerant, in upper and lower positions on a slope in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effects of the competitive position for the light environment and developmental constraints on the crown architecture of two species that have different degrees of shade tolerance. In both species, the maximum attainable height was smaller on the upper slope than on the lower slope. The light environment brightened with increasing tree height. Trees in similar competitive position and thus similar light environments were shorter on the upper slope than on the lower slope. When we considered tree height relative to the maximum attainable height, the difference between the upper and lower slopes in the relationship of competitive position to tree height disappeared. Thus, relative tree height was a good index of the competitive position for the light environment when the trees of both slope positions were pooled. The relationships of crown depth and width to relative tree height differed between trees on the upper and lower slopes, while the relationships of crown depth and width to actual tree height were similar. This suggests that developmental constraints are more important than the competitive position in determining the crown architecture of the two species. However, variation in crown architecture was greater in Q. crispula than in F. crenata, probably because of the difference in shade tolerance between the two species.

AB - We examined the crown architecture of two canopy species, Fagus crenata Blume, which is highly shade tolerant, and Quercus crispula Blume, which is less shade tolerant, in upper and lower positions on a slope in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effects of the competitive position for the light environment and developmental constraints on the crown architecture of two species that have different degrees of shade tolerance. In both species, the maximum attainable height was smaller on the upper slope than on the lower slope. The light environment brightened with increasing tree height. Trees in similar competitive position and thus similar light environments were shorter on the upper slope than on the lower slope. When we considered tree height relative to the maximum attainable height, the difference between the upper and lower slopes in the relationship of competitive position to tree height disappeared. Thus, relative tree height was a good index of the competitive position for the light environment when the trees of both slope positions were pooled. The relationships of crown depth and width to relative tree height differed between trees on the upper and lower slopes, while the relationships of crown depth and width to actual tree height were similar. This suggests that developmental constraints are more important than the competitive position in determining the crown architecture of the two species. However, variation in crown architecture was greater in Q. crispula than in F. crenata, probably because of the difference in shade tolerance between the two species.

KW - Crown depth

KW - Crown width

KW - Fagus crenata

KW - Maximum height

KW - Quercus crispula

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0842284774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0842284774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.foreco.2003.08.003

DO - 10.1016/j.foreco.2003.08.003

M3 - Article

VL - 188

SP - 337

EP - 347

JO - Forest Ecology and Management

JF - Forest Ecology and Management

SN - 0378-1127

IS - 1-3

ER -