Cell-cycle-dependent drug-resistant quiescent cancer cells induce tumor angiogenesis after chemotherapy as visualized by real-time FUCCI imaging

Shuya Yano, Kiyoto Takehara, Hiroshi Tazawa, Hiroyuki Kishimoto, Yasuo Urata, Shunsuke Kagawa, Toshiyoshi Fujiwara, Robert M. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We previously demonstrated that quiescent cancer cells in a tumor are resistant to conventional chemotherapy as visualized with a fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). We also showed that proliferating cancer cells exist in a tumor only near nascent vessels or on the tumor surface as visualized with FUCCI and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing tumor vessels. In the present study, we show the relationship between cell-cycle phase and chemotherapy-induced tumor angiogenesis using in vivo FUCCI real-time imaging of the cell cycle and nestin-driven GFP to detect nascent blood vessels. We observed that chemotherapy-treated tumors, consisting of mostly of quiescent cancer cells after treatment, had much more and deeper tumor vessels than untreated tumors. These newly-vascularized cancer cells regrew rapidly after chemotherapy. In contrast, formerly quiescent cancer cells decoyed to S/G2 phase by a telomerase-dependent adenovirus did not induce tumor angiogenesis. The present results further demonstrate the importance of the cancer-cell position in the cell cycle in order that chemotherapy be effective and not have the opposite effect of stimulating tumor angiogenesis and progression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)406-414
Number of pages9
JournalCell Cycle
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 4 2017

Keywords

  • FUCCI
  • angiogenesis
  • cell cycle
  • chemotherapy
  • decoy
  • imaging
  • quiescence
  • resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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