Causal impact of local inflammation in the nasal cavity on higher brain function and cognition

Yuto Hasegawa, Ho Namkung, Amy Smith, Shinji Sakamoto, Xiaolei Zhu, Koko Ishizuka, Andrew P. Lane, Akira Sawa, Atsushi Kamiya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Epidemiological evidence suggests that adverse environmental factors in the nasal cavity may increase the risk for neuropsychiatric diseases. For instance, air pollution and nasal viral infection have been underscored as risk factors for Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. These adverse factors can elicit local inflammation in the nasal cavity, which may in turn influence higher brain function. Nevertheless, evidence that directly supports their causal link is missing. To fill this knowledge gap, we used an inducible mouse model for olfactory inflammation and showed the evidence that this local pathological factor can elicit behavioral abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-115
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience Research
Volume172
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • COVID-19
  • Inducible olfactory inflammation
  • Nasal inflammation
  • Olfactory epithelium
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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