Catch-Up Growth and Neurobehavioral Development among Full-Term, Small-for-Gestational-Age Children: A Nationwide Japanese Population-Based Study

Akihito Takeuchi, Takashi Yorifuji, Kazue Nakamura, Kei Tamai, Shigehiro Mori, Makoto Nakamura, Misao Kageyama, Toshihide Kubo, Tatsuya Ogino, Katsuhiro Kobayashi, Hiroyuki Doi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the relationship between catch-up growth of full-term, small for gestational age (SGA) children and their neurobehavioral development. Study design: Data were obtained from a population-based nationwide Japanese longitudinal survey that started in 2001. Study participants were full-term children with information on height at 2 years of age (n = 32 533). Catch-up growth for SGA infants was defined as achieving a height at 2 years of age of more than -2.0 standard deviations for chronological age. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs for the associations of SGA and catch-up growth status with neurobehavioral development at 2.5 and 8 years of age, adjusting for potential infant- and parent-related confounding factors. Results: Fifteen percent of term SGA infants failed to catch up in height. At 2.5 years of age, SGA children without catch-up growth were more likely to be unable to climb stairs (OR, 10.42; 95% CI, 5.55-19.56) and unable to compose a 2-word sentence (OR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.81-7.08) compared with children with normal growth at birth. Furthermore, SGA children without catch-up growth were at increased risk for aggressive behaviors (OR, 3.85; 95% CI, 1.19-12.47) at 8 years of age. Conclusions: Continuous follow-up for full-term SGA infants with failure of catch-up growth or poor postnatal growth may be beneficial for early detection and intervention for behavioral problems.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Growth and Development
Gestational Age
Small for Gestational Age Infant
Growth
Population
Risk-Taking
Longitudinal Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Parturition

Keywords

  • Aggressive behavior
  • Attention
  • Language development
  • Motor development
  • Personal-social development
  • Postnatal growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Catch-Up Growth and Neurobehavioral Development among Full-Term, Small-for-Gestational-Age Children : A Nationwide Japanese Population-Based Study. / Takeuchi, Akihito; Yorifuji, Takashi; Nakamura, Kazue; Tamai, Kei; Mori, Shigehiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Kageyama, Misao; Kubo, Toshihide; Ogino, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Doi, Hiroyuki.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takeuchi, Akihito ; Yorifuji, Takashi ; Nakamura, Kazue ; Tamai, Kei ; Mori, Shigehiro ; Nakamura, Makoto ; Kageyama, Misao ; Kubo, Toshihide ; Ogino, Tatsuya ; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro ; Doi, Hiroyuki. / Catch-Up Growth and Neurobehavioral Development among Full-Term, Small-for-Gestational-Age Children : A Nationwide Japanese Population-Based Study. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2017.
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abstract = "Objective: To examine the relationship between catch-up growth of full-term, small for gestational age (SGA) children and their neurobehavioral development. Study design: Data were obtained from a population-based nationwide Japanese longitudinal survey that started in 2001. Study participants were full-term children with information on height at 2 years of age (n = 32 533). Catch-up growth for SGA infants was defined as achieving a height at 2 years of age of more than -2.0 standard deviations for chronological age. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate ORs and 95{\%} CIs for the associations of SGA and catch-up growth status with neurobehavioral development at 2.5 and 8 years of age, adjusting for potential infant- and parent-related confounding factors. Results: Fifteen percent of term SGA infants failed to catch up in height. At 2.5 years of age, SGA children without catch-up growth were more likely to be unable to climb stairs (OR, 10.42; 95{\%} CI, 5.55-19.56) and unable to compose a 2-word sentence (OR, 3.58; 95{\%} CI, 1.81-7.08) compared with children with normal growth at birth. Furthermore, SGA children without catch-up growth were at increased risk for aggressive behaviors (OR, 3.85; 95{\%} CI, 1.19-12.47) at 8 years of age. Conclusions: Continuous follow-up for full-term SGA infants with failure of catch-up growth or poor postnatal growth may be beneficial for early detection and intervention for behavioral problems.",
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AU - Yorifuji, Takashi

AU - Nakamura, Kazue

AU - Tamai, Kei

AU - Mori, Shigehiro

AU - Nakamura, Makoto

AU - Kageyama, Misao

AU - Kubo, Toshihide

AU - Ogino, Tatsuya

AU - Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

AU - Doi, Hiroyuki

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AB - Objective: To examine the relationship between catch-up growth of full-term, small for gestational age (SGA) children and their neurobehavioral development. Study design: Data were obtained from a population-based nationwide Japanese longitudinal survey that started in 2001. Study participants were full-term children with information on height at 2 years of age (n = 32 533). Catch-up growth for SGA infants was defined as achieving a height at 2 years of age of more than -2.0 standard deviations for chronological age. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs for the associations of SGA and catch-up growth status with neurobehavioral development at 2.5 and 8 years of age, adjusting for potential infant- and parent-related confounding factors. Results: Fifteen percent of term SGA infants failed to catch up in height. At 2.5 years of age, SGA children without catch-up growth were more likely to be unable to climb stairs (OR, 10.42; 95% CI, 5.55-19.56) and unable to compose a 2-word sentence (OR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.81-7.08) compared with children with normal growth at birth. Furthermore, SGA children without catch-up growth were at increased risk for aggressive behaviors (OR, 3.85; 95% CI, 1.19-12.47) at 8 years of age. Conclusions: Continuous follow-up for full-term SGA infants with failure of catch-up growth or poor postnatal growth may be beneficial for early detection and intervention for behavioral problems.

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KW - Attention

KW - Language development

KW - Motor development

KW - Personal-social development

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