Casual cynics or disillusioned democrats? Political alienation in Japan

Ikuo Kabashima, Jonathan Marshall, Takayoshi Uekami, Dae Song Hyun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the structure of political alienation among Japanese eligible voters, using data from the first, second, fifth, and sixth waves of the seven-wave Japanese Electoral Survey II (JES II). Political alienation can be expressed as comprising two dimensions, political trust and civic-mindedness. Males and people with more years of schooling are more allegiant in general; that is, they are both more trusting and more civic-minded. Evaluations of cabinet performance and support for democratic mechanisms are strongly related to political trust and civic-mindedness. Supporters of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) are no more civic-minded than average but are more trusting politically, whereas Japan Communist Party supporters are more civic-minded but a good deal less politically trusting than average. Independents are below the overall average on both the political trust and civic-mindedness dimensions. Even though party support is unstable, Japan's political system will not lose its stabilitv as long as LDP supporters and independents constitute the majority of Japan's electorate. The advent of a new party capable of providing an alternative to the LDP is important to the future of Japanese democracy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)779-804
Number of pages26
JournalPolitical Psychology
Volume21
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

alienation
party supporter
Japan
Political Systems
Democracy
communist party
political system
democracy
evaluation
performance
Civics
Cynic
Alienation
Democratic Party
Supporters

Keywords

  • Japan
  • Party identification
  • Political alienation
  • Political efficacy
  • Political trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Kabashima, I., Marshall, J., Uekami, T., & Hyun, D. S. (2000). Casual cynics or disillusioned democrats? Political alienation in Japan. Political Psychology, 21(4), 779-804.

Casual cynics or disillusioned democrats? Political alienation in Japan. / Kabashima, Ikuo; Marshall, Jonathan; Uekami, Takayoshi; Hyun, Dae Song.

In: Political Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 4, 12.2000, p. 779-804.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kabashima, I, Marshall, J, Uekami, T & Hyun, DS 2000, 'Casual cynics or disillusioned democrats? Political alienation in Japan', Political Psychology, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 779-804.
Kabashima, Ikuo ; Marshall, Jonathan ; Uekami, Takayoshi ; Hyun, Dae Song. / Casual cynics or disillusioned democrats? Political alienation in Japan. In: Political Psychology. 2000 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 779-804.
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