Cancer and non-cancer excess mortality resulting from mixed exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from contaminated rice oil

“Yusho”

Saori Kashima, Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda, Akira Eboshida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: In 1968, rice oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans caused a severe outbreak of food poisoning in Japan and was termed locally as “Yusho” (oil disease). In our previous study, we found that area-based standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of some diseases were elevated shortly after the incident. This previous study, however, was unable to determine whether these elevated SMRs were a result of other area-specific factors. To overcome this limitation, we obtained mortality data from the 5 years before the incident and conducted an area-based study using vital statistics records dating from 1963 to 2002. Methods: The population of Nagasaki Prefecture was set as the reference population for calculating SMRs. We also included data on cause-specific mortality attributable to cancer and expanded the population to encompass two severely exposed areas where contaminated rice oil was distributed (namely Tamanoura and Naru). We also calculated SMRs in the remainder of the Shimo-Goto region, excluding the exposed area, which was used as a comparison area. Results: Even after considering the time trends in mortality before the incident, mortality due to diabetes mellitus and heart disease, as well as all-cause mortality, was found to be elevated shortly afterward. Additionally, mortalities due to uterine cancer in Tamanoura and leukemia were also elevated at 30–34 and 10–59 years after the event in both exposed areas, respectively. SMRs for leukemia in Tamanoura were as high as 3.0 (95 % confidence interval 1.4–6.2) and 2.4 (1.2–4.8) 10–19 years later. In this period, SMRs for leukemia in the comparison area were not elevated. Conclusions: Further epidemiological studies are needed regarding this rice-oil, “Yusho” outbreak, especially with regard to cancer and non-cancer mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-430
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume88
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Oils
Mortality
Neoplasms
Leukemia
Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans
Oryza
Disease Outbreaks
Population
Vital Statistics
Uterine Neoplasms
Foodborne Diseases
Epidemiologic Studies
Heart Diseases
Diabetes Mellitus
Japan

Keywords

  • Chlorinated dibenzofurans
  • Food contamination
  • Heart disease
  • Leukemia
  • Mortality
  • Polychlorinated biphenyls

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{7aa96b914db947b5b988d7e130c83d43,
title = "Cancer and non-cancer excess mortality resulting from mixed exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from contaminated rice oil: “Yusho”",
abstract = "Purpose: In 1968, rice oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans caused a severe outbreak of food poisoning in Japan and was termed locally as “Yusho” (oil disease). In our previous study, we found that area-based standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of some diseases were elevated shortly after the incident. This previous study, however, was unable to determine whether these elevated SMRs were a result of other area-specific factors. To overcome this limitation, we obtained mortality data from the 5 years before the incident and conducted an area-based study using vital statistics records dating from 1963 to 2002. Methods: The population of Nagasaki Prefecture was set as the reference population for calculating SMRs. We also included data on cause-specific mortality attributable to cancer and expanded the population to encompass two severely exposed areas where contaminated rice oil was distributed (namely Tamanoura and Naru). We also calculated SMRs in the remainder of the Shimo-Goto region, excluding the exposed area, which was used as a comparison area. Results: Even after considering the time trends in mortality before the incident, mortality due to diabetes mellitus and heart disease, as well as all-cause mortality, was found to be elevated shortly afterward. Additionally, mortalities due to uterine cancer in Tamanoura and leukemia were also elevated at 30–34 and 10–59 years after the event in both exposed areas, respectively. SMRs for leukemia in Tamanoura were as high as 3.0 (95 {\%} confidence interval 1.4–6.2) and 2.4 (1.2–4.8) 10–19 years later. In this period, SMRs for leukemia in the comparison area were not elevated. Conclusions: Further epidemiological studies are needed regarding this rice-oil, “Yusho” outbreak, especially with regard to cancer and non-cancer mortality.",
keywords = "Chlorinated dibenzofurans, Food contamination, Heart disease, Leukemia, Mortality, Polychlorinated biphenyls",
author = "Saori Kashima and Takashi Yorifuji and Toshihide Tsuda and Akira Eboshida",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1007/s00420-014-0966-1",
language = "English",
volume = "88",
pages = "419--430",
journal = "International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health",
issn = "0340-0131",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Cancer and non-cancer excess mortality resulting from mixed exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from contaminated rice oil

T2 - “Yusho”

AU - Kashima, Saori

AU - Yorifuji, Takashi

AU - Tsuda, Toshihide

AU - Eboshida, Akira

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Purpose: In 1968, rice oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans caused a severe outbreak of food poisoning in Japan and was termed locally as “Yusho” (oil disease). In our previous study, we found that area-based standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of some diseases were elevated shortly after the incident. This previous study, however, was unable to determine whether these elevated SMRs were a result of other area-specific factors. To overcome this limitation, we obtained mortality data from the 5 years before the incident and conducted an area-based study using vital statistics records dating from 1963 to 2002. Methods: The population of Nagasaki Prefecture was set as the reference population for calculating SMRs. We also included data on cause-specific mortality attributable to cancer and expanded the population to encompass two severely exposed areas where contaminated rice oil was distributed (namely Tamanoura and Naru). We also calculated SMRs in the remainder of the Shimo-Goto region, excluding the exposed area, which was used as a comparison area. Results: Even after considering the time trends in mortality before the incident, mortality due to diabetes mellitus and heart disease, as well as all-cause mortality, was found to be elevated shortly afterward. Additionally, mortalities due to uterine cancer in Tamanoura and leukemia were also elevated at 30–34 and 10–59 years after the event in both exposed areas, respectively. SMRs for leukemia in Tamanoura were as high as 3.0 (95 % confidence interval 1.4–6.2) and 2.4 (1.2–4.8) 10–19 years later. In this period, SMRs for leukemia in the comparison area were not elevated. Conclusions: Further epidemiological studies are needed regarding this rice-oil, “Yusho” outbreak, especially with regard to cancer and non-cancer mortality.

AB - Purpose: In 1968, rice oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans caused a severe outbreak of food poisoning in Japan and was termed locally as “Yusho” (oil disease). In our previous study, we found that area-based standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of some diseases were elevated shortly after the incident. This previous study, however, was unable to determine whether these elevated SMRs were a result of other area-specific factors. To overcome this limitation, we obtained mortality data from the 5 years before the incident and conducted an area-based study using vital statistics records dating from 1963 to 2002. Methods: The population of Nagasaki Prefecture was set as the reference population for calculating SMRs. We also included data on cause-specific mortality attributable to cancer and expanded the population to encompass two severely exposed areas where contaminated rice oil was distributed (namely Tamanoura and Naru). We also calculated SMRs in the remainder of the Shimo-Goto region, excluding the exposed area, which was used as a comparison area. Results: Even after considering the time trends in mortality before the incident, mortality due to diabetes mellitus and heart disease, as well as all-cause mortality, was found to be elevated shortly afterward. Additionally, mortalities due to uterine cancer in Tamanoura and leukemia were also elevated at 30–34 and 10–59 years after the event in both exposed areas, respectively. SMRs for leukemia in Tamanoura were as high as 3.0 (95 % confidence interval 1.4–6.2) and 2.4 (1.2–4.8) 10–19 years later. In this period, SMRs for leukemia in the comparison area were not elevated. Conclusions: Further epidemiological studies are needed regarding this rice-oil, “Yusho” outbreak, especially with regard to cancer and non-cancer mortality.

KW - Chlorinated dibenzofurans

KW - Food contamination

KW - Heart disease

KW - Leukemia

KW - Mortality

KW - Polychlorinated biphenyls

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DO - 10.1007/s00420-014-0966-1

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JO - International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

JF - International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

SN - 0340-0131

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