Can stress management at the workplace prevent depression? A randomized controlled trial

Yoshio Mino, Akira Babazono, Toshihide Tsuda, Nobufumi Yasuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Stress, mental health and depression at the workplace have emerged as common and significant problems. The effectiveness of a stress-management program at the workplace was investigated. Methods: The effectiveness of a stress-management program was examined in workers at a highly stressful workplace using a randomized controlled trial. The 58 workers in the office were randomly assigned into a stress-management group (n = 28) and a control group (n = 30). The stress-management program included lectures on the perception of stress, measures to cope with it, stress-management recording sheets, and e-mail counseling. This program was based on the cognitive behavioral approach. The stress-management program was carried out for 3 months, and perceived work-related stress and psychological symptoms were evaluated using: General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-30, Center for Epidemiologic Study for Depression (CES-D), the Questionnaire of Work-Related Stress and the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire. Twenty-one out of the 28 in the stress-management group and all in the control group were successfully followed up. Results: In the stress-management group, a significant improvement in the depressive symptoms was observed, compared with the control group in CES-D (p = 0.003 by two-tailed paired t-test, and p = 0.042 by repeated measure analysis of variance). In the multiple regression analysis, the effect of stress management on depressive symptoms at follow-up was significant (p = 0.041), controlling for potential confounding factors. However, the alleviation of perceived occupational stress was limited. Conclusions: A stress-management program based on the cognitive behavioral approach at the workplace may have potential for the prevention of depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-182
Number of pages6
JournalPsychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006

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Workplace
Randomized Controlled Trials
Depression
Control Groups
Epidemiologic Studies
Postal Service
Reward
Psychological Stress
Counseling
Analysis of Variance
Mental Health
Regression Analysis
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Mental health
  • Stress management
  • Workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Can stress management at the workplace prevent depression? A randomized controlled trial. / Mino, Yoshio; Babazono, Akira; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yasuda, Nobufumi.

In: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Vol. 75, No. 3, 04.2006, p. 177-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mino, Yoshio ; Babazono, Akira ; Tsuda, Toshihide ; Yasuda, Nobufumi. / Can stress management at the workplace prevent depression? A randomized controlled trial. In: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. 2006 ; Vol. 75, No. 3. pp. 177-182.
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