Calcification responses of symbiotic and aposymbiotic corals to near-future levels of ocean acidification

S. Ohki, T. Irie, Mayuri Takeuchi, K. Shinmen, H. Kawahata, T. Nakamura, A. Kato, Y. Nojiri, A. Suzuki, K. Sakai, R. Van Woesik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing the acidity of ocean waters will directly threaten calcifying marine organisms such as reef-building scleractinian corals, and the myriad of species that rely on corals for protection and sustenance. Ocean pH has already decreased by around 0.1 pH units since the beginning of the industrial revolution, and is expected to decrease by another 0.2-0.4 pH units by 2100. This study mimicked the pre-industrial, present, and near-future levels of pCO 2 using a precise control system (± 5 % pCO 2 ), to assess the impact of ocean acidification on the calcification of recently settled primary polyps of Acropora digitifera, both with and without symbionts, and adult fragments with symbionts. The increase in pCO 2 of ∼ 100 µatm between the pre-industrial period and the present had more effect on the calcification rate of adult A. digitifera than the anticipated future increases of several hundreds of micro-atmospheres of pCO 2 . The primary polyps with symbionts showed higher calcification rates than primary polyps without symbionts, suggesting that: (i) primary polyps housing symbionts are more tolerant to near-future ocean acidification than organisms without symbionts, and (ii) corals acquiring symbionts from the environment (i.e., broadcasting species) will be more vulnerable to ocean acidification than corals that maternally acquire symbionts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6807-6814
Number of pages8
JournalBiogeosciences
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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calcification
symbiont
symbionts
corals
coral
polyp
Acropora
ocean acidification
organisms
ocean
control system
acidity
reefs
reef
seawater
oceans
atmosphere

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Calcification responses of symbiotic and aposymbiotic corals to near-future levels of ocean acidification. / Ohki, S.; Irie, T.; Takeuchi, Mayuri; Shinmen, K.; Kawahata, H.; Nakamura, T.; Kato, A.; Nojiri, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Sakai, K.; Van Woesik, R.

In: Biogeosciences, Vol. 10, No. 11, 01.01.2013, p. 6807-6814.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohki, S, Irie, T, Takeuchi, M, Shinmen, K, Kawahata, H, Nakamura, T, Kato, A, Nojiri, Y, Suzuki, A, Sakai, K & Van Woesik, R 2013, 'Calcification responses of symbiotic and aposymbiotic corals to near-future levels of ocean acidification', Biogeosciences, vol. 10, no. 11, pp. 6807-6814. https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-10-6807-2013
Ohki, S. ; Irie, T. ; Takeuchi, Mayuri ; Shinmen, K. ; Kawahata, H. ; Nakamura, T. ; Kato, A. ; Nojiri, Y. ; Suzuki, A. ; Sakai, K. ; Van Woesik, R. / Calcification responses of symbiotic and aposymbiotic corals to near-future levels of ocean acidification. In: Biogeosciences. 2013 ; Vol. 10, No. 11. pp. 6807-6814.
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