Blood microvascular organization of the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue of the guinea pig: a scanning electron microscopic study of corrosion casts.

S. Okada, Aiji Ohtsuka, H. Akagi, Kazunori Nishizaki, Y. Masuda

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has previously been confirmed that the guinea pig has aggregations of 10-20 lymphoid follicles at the junction of the nasal cavity and the nasopharyngeal duct. The vascular architecture of this nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) was studied by the corrosion cast/scanning electron microscope method. The NALT was supplied by branches of the inferior nasal artery. These afferent arterial branches gave off arterioles to the follicles and the interfollicular regions, where the arterioles ramified into capillaries. Some of these arterioles reached the subepithelial region to form a single-layer dense capillary network. The subepithelial capillaries gathered into short collecting venules, which in turn drained into high endothelial venules (HEV) in the interfollicular region. The HEV, which also receives tributaries from the follicular and interfollicular capillary plexuses, descended in the interfollicular regions and finally flowed into the efferent veins at the bottom of the NALT. Indentations impressed by high endothelial cells (HEC) were prominent on the surface of the HEV casts, and their frequency was larger in the upper course or segments than in the lower. This suggests that the incidence of HEC in the upper segments is higher than in the lower segments, and these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that some substances which are taken up into the subepithelial capillaries and transported to the venules induce differentiation and maintain of HEVs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-219
Number of pages7
JournalActa Medica Okayama
Volume49
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1995

Fingerprint

Corrosion
Venules
Lymphoid Tissue
Nose
Guinea Pigs
Blood
Endothelial cells
Electrons
Tissue
Scanning
Arterioles
Indentation
Ducts
Endothelial Cells
Electron microscopes
Agglomeration
Nasal Cavity
Blood Vessels
Veins
Arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

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title = "Blood microvascular organization of the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue of the guinea pig: a scanning electron microscopic study of corrosion casts.",
abstract = "It has previously been confirmed that the guinea pig has aggregations of 10-20 lymphoid follicles at the junction of the nasal cavity and the nasopharyngeal duct. The vascular architecture of this nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) was studied by the corrosion cast/scanning electron microscope method. The NALT was supplied by branches of the inferior nasal artery. These afferent arterial branches gave off arterioles to the follicles and the interfollicular regions, where the arterioles ramified into capillaries. Some of these arterioles reached the subepithelial region to form a single-layer dense capillary network. The subepithelial capillaries gathered into short collecting venules, which in turn drained into high endothelial venules (HEV) in the interfollicular region. The HEV, which also receives tributaries from the follicular and interfollicular capillary plexuses, descended in the interfollicular regions and finally flowed into the efferent veins at the bottom of the NALT. Indentations impressed by high endothelial cells (HEC) were prominent on the surface of the HEV casts, and their frequency was larger in the upper course or segments than in the lower. This suggests that the incidence of HEC in the upper segments is higher than in the lower segments, and these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that some substances which are taken up into the subepithelial capillaries and transported to the venules induce differentiation and maintain of HEVs.",
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T1 - Blood microvascular organization of the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue of the guinea pig

T2 - a scanning electron microscopic study of corrosion casts.

AU - Okada, S.

AU - Ohtsuka, Aiji

AU - Akagi, H.

AU - Nishizaki, Kazunori

AU - Masuda, Y.

PY - 1995/8

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