Biases in the estimation of spatial egg aggregation and association based on emergence data

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Spatial aggregation and association of conspecific and allospecific eggs over resource patches have often been estimated based on emergence data. However, intra-specific competition reduces the number of emergents of conspecifics, and inter-specific competition reduces the number of emergents of allospecifics, causing biases in the estimation of spatial distribution of eggs using emergence data. The present study investigated, by laboratory experiments using drosophilids and simulation models, how the use of emergence data causes such biases. In the laboratory experiments, females were allowed to oviposit over resource patches, and spatial aggregation and association of eggs were examined. The number of emergents from each resource patch was then estimated from the density-survival relationship, and spatial aggregation and association of emerging adults thus estimated were compared with those of eggs. In the simulation models, the spatial distributions of adults emerging from eggs that varied in their degree of spatial aggregation were evaluated under different intensities of intra- and/or inter-specific competition. Both laboratory experiments and simulations indicate that the use of emergence data always causes an underestimation of spatial aggregation and association of eggs. Relaxation of intra- and inter-specific competition by addition of extra resources would improve the estimation of spatial egg distribution based on emergence data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-466
Number of pages8
JournalEcological Research
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

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interspecific competition
egg
simulation models
spatial distribution
intraspecific competition
resource
simulation
laboratory experiment

Keywords

  • Aggregation model
  • Drosophila
  • Inter-specific competition
  • Intra-specific competition
  • Patchy resource

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Biases in the estimation of spatial egg aggregation and association based on emergence data. / Takahashi, Kazuo.

In: Ecological Research, Vol. 22, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 459-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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