Behavioral approach to facilitate appropriate use of antibiotics

Osamu Matsushita, Kazuko Higuchi, Noriko Ishii, Kiyoshi Negayama, Tomohiko Taminato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many hospitals have infection control education programs to facilitate the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents. Even with these efforts, however, it is not rare to encounter irregular prescriptions. In order to solve this discrepancy between knowledge and actual behavior, we chose an alternative approach to improve the decision making process. Recent advances in information technology have made it possible to not only instantly integrate various bacterial examination results using a computer, but to simultaneously carry out the statistical analyses at a much lower cost. We employed a client-server system to accomplish these tasks in Kagawa University Hospital. By connecting CCD camera-equipped microscopes to the system directly, image uploading has become a single-clicking job. Various microbial examination data were automatically transferred to the system once they became available in analytical devices such as BacT/ALERT 3D, VITEK, and an MIC analyzer. These data were presented to hospital doctors in well-designed web windows without delay. By removing psychological barriers to access laboratory examination data, statistics, and relevant information, more doctors seemed to independently follow scientific processes to choose antimicrobial agents. The daily behavior of hospital doctors has also been influenced by the system, e. g., pasting the microscopic images onto clinical records, or starting Gram staining in their own wards. These subtle but fundamental changes will eventually alter the way they make prescription decisions. The computer system was also useful for the infection control team to monitor and detect nosocomial infections, which has become essential to carry out its daily activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)994-1006
Number of pages13
JournalRinsho byori. The Japanese journal of clinical pathology
Volume56
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Infection Control
Cross Infection
Anti-Infective Agents
Prescriptions
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Computer Systems
Decision Making
Staining and Labeling
Psychology
Technology
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Behavioral approach to facilitate appropriate use of antibiotics. / Matsushita, Osamu; Higuchi, Kazuko; Ishii, Noriko; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Taminato, Tomohiko.

In: Rinsho byori. The Japanese journal of clinical pathology, Vol. 56, No. 11, 11.2008, p. 994-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsushita, O, Higuchi, K, Ishii, N, Negayama, K & Taminato, T 2008, 'Behavioral approach to facilitate appropriate use of antibiotics', Rinsho byori. The Japanese journal of clinical pathology, vol. 56, no. 11, pp. 994-1006.
Matsushita, Osamu ; Higuchi, Kazuko ; Ishii, Noriko ; Negayama, Kiyoshi ; Taminato, Tomohiko. / Behavioral approach to facilitate appropriate use of antibiotics. In: Rinsho byori. The Japanese journal of clinical pathology. 2008 ; Vol. 56, No. 11. pp. 994-1006.
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