Axolotl liver regeneration is accomplished via compensatory congestion mechanisms regulated by ERK signaling after partial hepatectomy

Ayaka Ohashi, Nanami Saito, Rena Kashimoto, Saya Furukawa, Sakiya Yamamoto, Akira Satoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Axolotls have remarkable organ-level regeneration capability. They can regenerate their limbs, tail, brain, gills, and heart. The liver had been considered to be a regenerative organ in these highly regeneration-competent animals. Therefore, no research had been performed on liver regeneration in urodele amphibians. In the present study, we focused on axolotl liver regeneration and found a unique regeneration mechanism compared with other vertebrates. Results: Partial hepatectomy (PH) was performed to assess axolotl liver regeneration. Regeneration was assessed using block-face imaging (CoMBi), histology, cell proliferation, weight gain, and Albumin (Alb) + area. Axolotl liver histology was compared with other vertebrates. Axolotl liver consists of Glisson's capsule, sinusoids, and hepatic cord with no apparent lobule structures. Hepatocytes were mononucleated or multinucleated. PH increased the multinucleated hepatocytes and the Alb + area, but there was no apparent liver shape recovery even 40 days after PH. Gene expression pattern suggests that no epimorphic regeneration takes place. We also found that the increase in the number of proliferating hepatocytes was regulated by ERK-signaling. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that axolotls, which have epimorphic regeneration ability, regenerate their liver via unique mechanisms, compensatory congestion.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDevelopmental Dynamics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • compensatory congestion
  • ERK signaling
  • hepatectomy
  • hepatocyte
  • liver regeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology

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