ATP inhibition of proliferation of immortalized human fibroblasts is greater than that of normal human diploid fibroblasts.

B. Katayama, Masakiyo Sakaguchi, J. W. Li, H. Pu, Y. Inoue, M. Namba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

It is known that cancers develop by a multi-step process. Normal cells are first immortalized, and then transformed into tumorigenic cells. Normal human cells are very rarely immortalized, but once they are, they are relatively easily transformed into tumorigenic cells. This indicates that the immortalization step plays a critical part in the development of human cancers. Thus, elucidation of the mechanisms of this step would shed light on the process of carcinogenesis in human cells. To understand the causes of immortalization, it is important to determine the differences in cellular phenotype between immortalized and normal human cells. In this study, we found that immortalized human fibroblasts were more sensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of ATP than normal human fibroblasts. ADP was as effective as ATP, but AMP, adenosine, and phosphoric acid were not. These results indicate that a high-energy bound of ATP and ADP may contribute to the growth inhibition of the cells. When the immortalized cells were pulse-labeled with [32P]-ATP, 30-, 31-, 33- and 40-kDa membrane fraction proteins were more prominently labeled in the immortalized cells than in the normal cells. At present, the characteristics of these proteins are being investigated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)603-606
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Medicine
Volume2
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1998

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Diploidy
Fibroblasts
Adenosine Triphosphate
Adenosine Diphosphate
Inhibition (Psychology)
Human Development
Adenosine Monophosphate
Growth
Adenosine
Neoplasms
Membrane Proteins
Carcinogenesis
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

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ATP inhibition of proliferation of immortalized human fibroblasts is greater than that of normal human diploid fibroblasts. / Katayama, B.; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Li, J. W.; Pu, H.; Inoue, Y.; Namba, M.

In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, Vol. 2, No. 5, 11.1998, p. 603-606.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Inoue, Y.

AU - Namba, M.

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