Atelectasis and mechanical ventilation mode during conservative oxygen therapy: A before-and-after study

Satoshi Suzuki, Glenn M. Eastwood, Mark D. Goodwin, Geertje D. Noë, Paul E. Smith, Neil Glassford, Antoine G. Schneider, Rinaldo Bellomo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of a conservative oxygen therapy (COT) (target SpO2 of 90%-92%) on radiological atelectasis and mechanical ventilation modes. Materials and methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of 105 intensive care unit patients from a pilot before-and-after study. The primary outcomes of this study were changes in atelectasis score (AS) of 555 chest radiographs assessed by radiologists blinded to treatment allocation and time to weaning from mandatory ventilation and first spontaneous ventilation trial (SVT). Results: There was a significant difference in overall AS between groups, and COT was associated with lower time-weighted average AS. In addition, in COT patients, change from mandatory to spontaneous ventilation or time to first SVT was shortened. After adjustment for baseline characteristics and interactions between oxygen therapy, radiological atelectasis, and mechanical ventilation management, patients in the COT group had significantly lower "best" AS (adjusted odds ratio, 0.28 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.12-0.66]; P = .003) and greater improvement in AS in the first 7 days (adjusted odds ratio, 0.42 [95% CI, 0.17-0.99]; P = .049). Moreover, COT was associated with significantly earlier successful weaning from a mandatory ventilation mode (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.96 [95% CI, 1.73-5.04]; P <.001) and with shorter time to first SVT (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 [95% CI, 1.13-2.78]; P = .013). Conclusions: In mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients, COT might be associated with decreased radiological evidence of atelectasis, earlier weaning from mandatory ventilation modes, and earlier first trial of spontaneous ventilation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number51909
Pages (from-to)1232-1237
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Critical Care
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Atelectasis
Artificial Respiration
Ventilation
Oxygen
Confidence Intervals
Intensive Care Units
Odds Ratio
Conservative Treatment
Thorax
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Atelectasis
  • Critical illness
  • Hyperoxia
  • Mechanical ventilation
  • Oxygen
  • Oxygen inhalation therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Suzuki, S., Eastwood, G. M., Goodwin, M. D., Noë, G. D., Smith, P. E., Glassford, N., ... Bellomo, R. (2015). Atelectasis and mechanical ventilation mode during conservative oxygen therapy: A before-and-after study. Journal of Critical Care, 30(6), 1232-1237. [51909]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.07.033

Atelectasis and mechanical ventilation mode during conservative oxygen therapy : A before-and-after study. / Suzuki, Satoshi; Eastwood, Glenn M.; Goodwin, Mark D.; Noë, Geertje D.; Smith, Paul E.; Glassford, Neil; Schneider, Antoine G.; Bellomo, Rinaldo.

In: Journal of Critical Care, Vol. 30, No. 6, 51909, 01.12.2015, p. 1232-1237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suzuki, S, Eastwood, GM, Goodwin, MD, Noë, GD, Smith, PE, Glassford, N, Schneider, AG & Bellomo, R 2015, 'Atelectasis and mechanical ventilation mode during conservative oxygen therapy: A before-and-after study', Journal of Critical Care, vol. 30, no. 6, 51909, pp. 1232-1237. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.07.033
Suzuki, Satoshi ; Eastwood, Glenn M. ; Goodwin, Mark D. ; Noë, Geertje D. ; Smith, Paul E. ; Glassford, Neil ; Schneider, Antoine G. ; Bellomo, Rinaldo. / Atelectasis and mechanical ventilation mode during conservative oxygen therapy : A before-and-after study. In: Journal of Critical Care. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 1232-1237.
@article{1738c45e6eef45c8930ac6b56ffc82f9,
title = "Atelectasis and mechanical ventilation mode during conservative oxygen therapy: A before-and-after study",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of a conservative oxygen therapy (COT) (target SpO2 of 90{\%}-92{\%}) on radiological atelectasis and mechanical ventilation modes. Materials and methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of 105 intensive care unit patients from a pilot before-and-after study. The primary outcomes of this study were changes in atelectasis score (AS) of 555 chest radiographs assessed by radiologists blinded to treatment allocation and time to weaning from mandatory ventilation and first spontaneous ventilation trial (SVT). Results: There was a significant difference in overall AS between groups, and COT was associated with lower time-weighted average AS. In addition, in COT patients, change from mandatory to spontaneous ventilation or time to first SVT was shortened. After adjustment for baseline characteristics and interactions between oxygen therapy, radiological atelectasis, and mechanical ventilation management, patients in the COT group had significantly lower {"}best{"} AS (adjusted odds ratio, 0.28 [95{\%} confidence interval {CI}, 0.12-0.66]; P = .003) and greater improvement in AS in the first 7 days (adjusted odds ratio, 0.42 [95{\%} CI, 0.17-0.99]; P = .049). Moreover, COT was associated with significantly earlier successful weaning from a mandatory ventilation mode (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.96 [95{\%} CI, 1.73-5.04]; P <.001) and with shorter time to first SVT (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 [95{\%} CI, 1.13-2.78]; P = .013). Conclusions: In mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients, COT might be associated with decreased radiological evidence of atelectasis, earlier weaning from mandatory ventilation modes, and earlier first trial of spontaneous ventilation.",
keywords = "Atelectasis, Critical illness, Hyperoxia, Mechanical ventilation, Oxygen, Oxygen inhalation therapy",
author = "Satoshi Suzuki and Eastwood, {Glenn M.} and Goodwin, {Mark D.} and No{\"e}, {Geertje D.} and Smith, {Paul E.} and Neil Glassford and Schneider, {Antoine G.} and Rinaldo Bellomo",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.07.033",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "1232--1237",
journal = "Journal of Critical Care",
issn = "0883-9441",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Atelectasis and mechanical ventilation mode during conservative oxygen therapy

T2 - A before-and-after study

AU - Suzuki, Satoshi

AU - Eastwood, Glenn M.

AU - Goodwin, Mark D.

AU - Noë, Geertje D.

AU - Smith, Paul E.

AU - Glassford, Neil

AU - Schneider, Antoine G.

AU - Bellomo, Rinaldo

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of a conservative oxygen therapy (COT) (target SpO2 of 90%-92%) on radiological atelectasis and mechanical ventilation modes. Materials and methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of 105 intensive care unit patients from a pilot before-and-after study. The primary outcomes of this study were changes in atelectasis score (AS) of 555 chest radiographs assessed by radiologists blinded to treatment allocation and time to weaning from mandatory ventilation and first spontaneous ventilation trial (SVT). Results: There was a significant difference in overall AS between groups, and COT was associated with lower time-weighted average AS. In addition, in COT patients, change from mandatory to spontaneous ventilation or time to first SVT was shortened. After adjustment for baseline characteristics and interactions between oxygen therapy, radiological atelectasis, and mechanical ventilation management, patients in the COT group had significantly lower "best" AS (adjusted odds ratio, 0.28 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.12-0.66]; P = .003) and greater improvement in AS in the first 7 days (adjusted odds ratio, 0.42 [95% CI, 0.17-0.99]; P = .049). Moreover, COT was associated with significantly earlier successful weaning from a mandatory ventilation mode (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.96 [95% CI, 1.73-5.04]; P <.001) and with shorter time to first SVT (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 [95% CI, 1.13-2.78]; P = .013). Conclusions: In mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients, COT might be associated with decreased radiological evidence of atelectasis, earlier weaning from mandatory ventilation modes, and earlier first trial of spontaneous ventilation.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of a conservative oxygen therapy (COT) (target SpO2 of 90%-92%) on radiological atelectasis and mechanical ventilation modes. Materials and methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of 105 intensive care unit patients from a pilot before-and-after study. The primary outcomes of this study were changes in atelectasis score (AS) of 555 chest radiographs assessed by radiologists blinded to treatment allocation and time to weaning from mandatory ventilation and first spontaneous ventilation trial (SVT). Results: There was a significant difference in overall AS between groups, and COT was associated with lower time-weighted average AS. In addition, in COT patients, change from mandatory to spontaneous ventilation or time to first SVT was shortened. After adjustment for baseline characteristics and interactions between oxygen therapy, radiological atelectasis, and mechanical ventilation management, patients in the COT group had significantly lower "best" AS (adjusted odds ratio, 0.28 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.12-0.66]; P = .003) and greater improvement in AS in the first 7 days (adjusted odds ratio, 0.42 [95% CI, 0.17-0.99]; P = .049). Moreover, COT was associated with significantly earlier successful weaning from a mandatory ventilation mode (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.96 [95% CI, 1.73-5.04]; P <.001) and with shorter time to first SVT (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 [95% CI, 1.13-2.78]; P = .013). Conclusions: In mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients, COT might be associated with decreased radiological evidence of atelectasis, earlier weaning from mandatory ventilation modes, and earlier first trial of spontaneous ventilation.

KW - Atelectasis

KW - Critical illness

KW - Hyperoxia

KW - Mechanical ventilation

KW - Oxygen

KW - Oxygen inhalation therapy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947021638&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84947021638&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.07.033

DO - 10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.07.033

M3 - Article

C2 - 26346814

AN - SCOPUS:84947021638

VL - 30

SP - 1232

EP - 1237

JO - Journal of Critical Care

JF - Journal of Critical Care

SN - 0883-9441

IS - 6

M1 - 51909

ER -