Associative visual learning, color discrimination, and chromatic adaptation in the harnessed honeybee Apis mellifera L.

Sayaka Hori, Hideaki Takeuchi, Kentaro Arikawa, Michiyo Kinoshita, Naoko Ichikawa, Masami Sasaki, Takeo Kubo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied associative visual learning in harnessed honeybees trained with monochromatic lights associated with a reward of sucrose solution delivered to the antennae and proboscis, to elicit the proboscis extension reflex (PER). We demonstrated five properties of visual learning under these conditions. First, antennae deprivation significantly increased visual acquisition, suggesting that sensory input from the antennae interferes with visual learning. Second, covering the compound eyes with silver paste significantly decreased visual acquisition, while covering the ocelli did not. Third, there was no significant difference in the visual acquisition between nurse bees, guard bees, and foragers. Fourth, bees conditioned with a 540-nm light stimulus exhibited light-induced PER with a 618-nm, but not with a 439-nm light stimulus. Finally, bees conditioned with a 540-nm light stimulus exhibited PER immediately after the 439-nm light was turned off, suggesting that the bees reacted to an afterimage induced by prior adaptation to the 439-nm light that might be similar to the 540-nm light.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)691-700
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology A
Volume192
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Discrimination Learning
honeybee
Bees
Apis mellifera
honey bees
learning
Color
Light
bee
proboscis
color
Apoidea
reflexes
antennae
Reflex
antenna
Learning
Afterimage
ocelli
compound eyes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Associative visual learning, color discrimination, and chromatic adaptation in the harnessed honeybee Apis mellifera L. / Hori, Sayaka; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Arikawa, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Ichikawa, Naoko; Sasaki, Masami; Kubo, Takeo.

In: Journal of Comparative Physiology A, Vol. 192, No. 7, 07.2006, p. 691-700.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hori, Sayaka ; Takeuchi, Hideaki ; Arikawa, Kentaro ; Kinoshita, Michiyo ; Ichikawa, Naoko ; Sasaki, Masami ; Kubo, Takeo. / Associative visual learning, color discrimination, and chromatic adaptation in the harnessed honeybee Apis mellifera L. In: Journal of Comparative Physiology A. 2006 ; Vol. 192, No. 7. pp. 691-700.
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