Associations of particulate matter with stroke mortality: A multicity study in Japan

Takashi Yorifuji, Saori Kashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Evidence linking short-term exposure to outdoor air pollution with hemorrhagic stroke is inconclusive. Methods: We evaluated the effects of suspended particulate matter (SPM) on cardiovascular disease mortality, focusing on types of stroke, from March 2005 to December 2010, in five selected prefectures in western Japan. A multicity time-series analysis was used, and Asian dust was adjusted in the models. Results: Even after adjusting for Asian dust, the same-day SPM was positively associated with several types of stroke mortality. Following a 10-μg/m3 increase in SPM, rate ratios were 1.014 (90% confidence interval [CI]: 1.002 to 1.026) for stroke, 1.030 (90% CI: 1.004 to 1.056) for intracerebral hemorrhage, and 1.016 (90% CI: 1.003 to 1.030) for ischemic stroke mortality. Conclusions: Short-term exposure to outdoor air pollution may increase the risks of hemorrhagic stroke as well as ischemic stroke mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)768-771
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume55
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

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Particulate Matter
Japan
Stroke
Mortality
Air Pollution
Confidence Intervals
Dust
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Cardiovascular Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Associations of particulate matter with stroke mortality : A multicity study in Japan. / Yorifuji, Takashi; Kashima, Saori.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 55, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 768-771.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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