Association of the upregulated expression of focal adhesion kinase with poor prognosis and tumor dissemination in hypopharyngeal cancer

Go Omura, Mizuo Ando, Yuki Saito, Kenya Kobayashi, Masafumi Yoshida, Yasuhiro Ebihara, Kaori Kanaya, Chisato Fujimoto, Takashi Sakamoto, Kenji Kondo, Takahiro Asakage, Tatsuya Yamasoba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays an important role in tumor metastasis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of FAK expression in surgically treated patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts of patients treated at our institution between 2004 and 2012 and identified 87 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. FAK expression status was retrospectively evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Results: FAK-positive patients displayed significantly worse disease-specific survival than FAK-negative patients (p =.001). Multivariate analyses revealed that FAK positivity and extracapsular spread (ECS) were independent, significant adverse prognostic factors. Furthermore, FAK positivity significantly correlated with the number of metastatic lymph nodes (p =.048), and FAK-positive patients displayed a higher incidence of distant metastases (p =.009). Conclusion: The current study demonstrated that upregulated FAK expression correlates with poor prognosis and tumor dissemination in surgically treated patients with hypopharyngeal cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1164-1169
Number of pages6
JournalHead and Neck
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • focal adhesion kinase
  • hypopharyngeal cancer
  • immunohistochemistry
  • pharyngectomy
  • prognostic factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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