Association between heart rate variability and home blood pressure

The toon health study

Isao Saito, Yasunori Takata, Koutatsu Maruyama, Eri Eguchi, Tadahiro Kato, Ryutaro Shirahama, Kiyohide Tomooka, Ryoichi Kawamura, Madoka Sano, Yasuharu Tabara, Haruhiko Osawa, Takeshi Tanigawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND Although blood pressure (BP) is regulated by the autonomic nervous system, it is not fully understood how autonomic activity affects BP at home in the general population. METHODS Subjects were enrolled from 2009 to 2012 and included 1,888 men and women aged 30-79 years. We measured casual BP in the morning during health checkups and asked participants to monitor BP at home twice in the morning and evening for 1 week. The mean of the two measurements of mean arterial pressure (MAP) was calculated. Five-minute recordings of the pulse wave from a fingertip sensor were used to determine the following indices of heart rate variability (HRV): standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences in RR intervals (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power, low frequency (LF) power, and LF/HF. RESULTS Sex- and age-adjusted means of casual MAP, and morning and evening MAP at home were significantly different among quartiles of SDNN, RMSSD, and HF. When further adjusted for smoking, alcohol drinking, medication for hypertension, diabetes, sleeping hours, snoring, and mental health status, the associations were somewhat attenuated. Inverse relationships were found between the means of morning home MAP, and RMSSD (P = 0.02) and HF (P = 0.051) after adjustment for confounders. The association between MAP and RMSSD, or MAP and HF was evident in individuals <65 years old. CONCLUSION Low HF and RMSSD, which reflect impaired parasympathetic nervous system activity, were associated with increased home MAP in the morning rather than in the evening.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1120-1126
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 11 2018

Fingerprint

Arterial Pressure
Heart Rate
Blood Pressure
Health
Mental Health Associations
Blood Pressure Monitors
Parasympathetic Nervous System
Snoring
Autonomic Nervous System
Alcohol Drinking
Health Status
Smoking
Hypertension
Population
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • autonomic nervous systems
  • blood pressure
  • epidemiology
  • heart rate variability
  • home blood pressure
  • hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Association between heart rate variability and home blood pressure : The toon health study. / Saito, Isao; Takata, Yasunori; Maruyama, Koutatsu; Eguchi, Eri; Kato, Tadahiro; Shirahama, Ryutaro; Tomooka, Kiyohide; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Sano, Madoka; Tabara, Yasuharu; Osawa, Haruhiko; Tanigawa, Takeshi.

In: American Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 31, No. 10, 11.09.2018, p. 1120-1126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saito, I, Takata, Y, Maruyama, K, Eguchi, E, Kato, T, Shirahama, R, Tomooka, K, Kawamura, R, Sano, M, Tabara, Y, Osawa, H & Tanigawa, T 2018, 'Association between heart rate variability and home blood pressure: The toon health study', American Journal of Hypertension, vol. 31, no. 10, pp. 1120-1126. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajh/hpy100
Saito, Isao ; Takata, Yasunori ; Maruyama, Koutatsu ; Eguchi, Eri ; Kato, Tadahiro ; Shirahama, Ryutaro ; Tomooka, Kiyohide ; Kawamura, Ryoichi ; Sano, Madoka ; Tabara, Yasuharu ; Osawa, Haruhiko ; Tanigawa, Takeshi. / Association between heart rate variability and home blood pressure : The toon health study. In: American Journal of Hypertension. 2018 ; Vol. 31, No. 10. pp. 1120-1126.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND Although blood pressure (BP) is regulated by the autonomic nervous system, it is not fully understood how autonomic activity affects BP at home in the general population. METHODS Subjects were enrolled from 2009 to 2012 and included 1,888 men and women aged 30-79 years. We measured casual BP in the morning during health checkups and asked participants to monitor BP at home twice in the morning and evening for 1 week. The mean of the two measurements of mean arterial pressure (MAP) was calculated. Five-minute recordings of the pulse wave from a fingertip sensor were used to determine the following indices of heart rate variability (HRV): standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences in RR intervals (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power, low frequency (LF) power, and LF/HF. RESULTS Sex- and age-adjusted means of casual MAP, and morning and evening MAP at home were significantly different among quartiles of SDNN, RMSSD, and HF. When further adjusted for smoking, alcohol drinking, medication for hypertension, diabetes, sleeping hours, snoring, and mental health status, the associations were somewhat attenuated. Inverse relationships were found between the means of morning home MAP, and RMSSD (P = 0.02) and HF (P = 0.051) after adjustment for confounders. The association between MAP and RMSSD, or MAP and HF was evident in individuals <65 years old. CONCLUSION Low HF and RMSSD, which reflect impaired parasympathetic nervous system activity, were associated with increased home MAP in the morning rather than in the evening.",
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AU - Saito, Isao

AU - Takata, Yasunori

AU - Maruyama, Koutatsu

AU - Eguchi, Eri

AU - Kato, Tadahiro

AU - Shirahama, Ryutaro

AU - Tomooka, Kiyohide

AU - Kawamura, Ryoichi

AU - Sano, Madoka

AU - Tabara, Yasuharu

AU - Osawa, Haruhiko

AU - Tanigawa, Takeshi

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Y1 - 2018/9/11

N2 - BACKGROUND Although blood pressure (BP) is regulated by the autonomic nervous system, it is not fully understood how autonomic activity affects BP at home in the general population. METHODS Subjects were enrolled from 2009 to 2012 and included 1,888 men and women aged 30-79 years. We measured casual BP in the morning during health checkups and asked participants to monitor BP at home twice in the morning and evening for 1 week. The mean of the two measurements of mean arterial pressure (MAP) was calculated. Five-minute recordings of the pulse wave from a fingertip sensor were used to determine the following indices of heart rate variability (HRV): standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences in RR intervals (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power, low frequency (LF) power, and LF/HF. RESULTS Sex- and age-adjusted means of casual MAP, and morning and evening MAP at home were significantly different among quartiles of SDNN, RMSSD, and HF. When further adjusted for smoking, alcohol drinking, medication for hypertension, diabetes, sleeping hours, snoring, and mental health status, the associations were somewhat attenuated. Inverse relationships were found between the means of morning home MAP, and RMSSD (P = 0.02) and HF (P = 0.051) after adjustment for confounders. The association between MAP and RMSSD, or MAP and HF was evident in individuals <65 years old. CONCLUSION Low HF and RMSSD, which reflect impaired parasympathetic nervous system activity, were associated with increased home MAP in the morning rather than in the evening.

AB - BACKGROUND Although blood pressure (BP) is regulated by the autonomic nervous system, it is not fully understood how autonomic activity affects BP at home in the general population. METHODS Subjects were enrolled from 2009 to 2012 and included 1,888 men and women aged 30-79 years. We measured casual BP in the morning during health checkups and asked participants to monitor BP at home twice in the morning and evening for 1 week. The mean of the two measurements of mean arterial pressure (MAP) was calculated. Five-minute recordings of the pulse wave from a fingertip sensor were used to determine the following indices of heart rate variability (HRV): standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences in RR intervals (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power, low frequency (LF) power, and LF/HF. RESULTS Sex- and age-adjusted means of casual MAP, and morning and evening MAP at home were significantly different among quartiles of SDNN, RMSSD, and HF. When further adjusted for smoking, alcohol drinking, medication for hypertension, diabetes, sleeping hours, snoring, and mental health status, the associations were somewhat attenuated. Inverse relationships were found between the means of morning home MAP, and RMSSD (P = 0.02) and HF (P = 0.051) after adjustment for confounders. The association between MAP and RMSSD, or MAP and HF was evident in individuals <65 years old. CONCLUSION Low HF and RMSSD, which reflect impaired parasympathetic nervous system activity, were associated with increased home MAP in the morning rather than in the evening.

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KW - epidemiology

KW - heart rate variability

KW - home blood pressure

KW - hypertension

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