Application of single prolonged stress induces post-traumatic stress disorder-like characteristics in mice

Ken Ichi Tanaka, Takao Yagi, Takeshi Nanba, Masato Asanuma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We tried to clarify the applicability of a single prolonged stress (SPS) protocol as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) model in mice. To investigate PTSD pathophysiology, we conducted hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) negative feedback testing at 1, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the SPS by administrating a dexamethasone (DEX) suppression test. The SPS induced over-suppression of the HPA system by DEX treatment at 8 and 12 weeks. To investigate PTSD-like behavioral characteristics, we subjected mice to testing in a light/dark box (to assess anxiety), a Y-maze (working memory), a cliff avoidance (visual cognition), and an open field (locomotor activity) at 1, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the SPS. In the light/dark box test, the SPS-applied mice spent significantly less time in the light box at 8 or 12 weeks. In the cliff avoidance test, the SPS-applied mice spent significantly less time in the open area at 1 week. However, in both the Y-maze test and the open field test, SPS-applied mice tended toward slight decreases in a time-dependent manner until 12 weeks. Therefore, SPS-applied mice may thus be useful for assessing characteristics relevant to PTSD that coincide with changes in the HPA axis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)479-486
Number of pages8
JournalActa Medica Okayama
Volume72
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

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Keywords

  • Corticosterone
  • Mouse
  • PTSD
  • Single prolonged stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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