Application of mechanical stimuli using a microfluidic air actuating system to cultured mammalian embryos

Jing Chun Li, Koji Matsuura, Yuka Kuroda, Hiroaki Funahashi, Keiji Naruse

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mammalian embryos experience not only hormonal but also mechanical stimuli, such as shear stress, compression, and friction force, in the fallopian tube before nidation. We aim to develop a novel and simple system to apply mechanical stimuli (MS) similar to those generated inside the oviduct to cultured mammalian embryos. Possible MS include shear stress (SS) caused by fluid dynamics and compression of embryos due to interactions with the wall of the oviduct. A new culture system was developed to increase SS and to apply MS during in vitro embryo cultures. We developed an air actuating system with microfluidic channels to apply MS by deforming a 0.1-mm-thick poly(dimethylsiloxiane) membrane and evaluated MS applied to ICR mouse embryos inside the microfluidic channel. Using this air actuating system, we applied compression to mouse embryos inside the medium channel and estimated SS on the basis of the velocity of the embryos' motion. By changing the syringe velocity, we applied different types of MS to the em bryos. These results suggested that multiple MS such as SS and compression can be applied at the same time. MS applied using this system was similar to those generated in the physiological environment of the oviduct.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2010 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science: From Micro and Nano Scale Systems to Robotics and Mechatronics Systems, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010
Pages29-34
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event21st Annual Symposium on Micro-Nano Mechatronics and Human Science, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010 - Nagoya, Japan
Duration: Nov 7 2010Nov 10 2010

Other

Other21st Annual Symposium on Micro-Nano Mechatronics and Human Science, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010
CountryJapan
CityNagoya
Period11/7/1011/10/10

Fingerprint

Microfluidics
Shear stress
Air
Syringes
Fluid dynamics
Compaction
Friction
Membranes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Li, J. C., Matsuura, K., Kuroda, Y., Funahashi, H., & Naruse, K. (2010). Application of mechanical stimuli using a microfluidic air actuating system to cultured mammalian embryos. In 2010 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science: From Micro and Nano Scale Systems to Robotics and Mechatronics Systems, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010 (pp. 29-34). [5669581] https://doi.org/10.1109/MHS.2010.5669581

Application of mechanical stimuli using a microfluidic air actuating system to cultured mammalian embryos. / Li, Jing Chun; Matsuura, Koji; Kuroda, Yuka; Funahashi, Hiroaki; Naruse, Keiji.

2010 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science: From Micro and Nano Scale Systems to Robotics and Mechatronics Systems, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010. 2010. p. 29-34 5669581.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Li, JC, Matsuura, K, Kuroda, Y, Funahashi, H & Naruse, K 2010, Application of mechanical stimuli using a microfluidic air actuating system to cultured mammalian embryos. in 2010 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science: From Micro and Nano Scale Systems to Robotics and Mechatronics Systems, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010., 5669581, pp. 29-34, 21st Annual Symposium on Micro-Nano Mechatronics and Human Science, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010, Nagoya, Japan, 11/7/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/MHS.2010.5669581
Li JC, Matsuura K, Kuroda Y, Funahashi H, Naruse K. Application of mechanical stimuli using a microfluidic air actuating system to cultured mammalian embryos. In 2010 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science: From Micro and Nano Scale Systems to Robotics and Mechatronics Systems, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010. 2010. p. 29-34. 5669581 https://doi.org/10.1109/MHS.2010.5669581
Li, Jing Chun ; Matsuura, Koji ; Kuroda, Yuka ; Funahashi, Hiroaki ; Naruse, Keiji. / Application of mechanical stimuli using a microfluidic air actuating system to cultured mammalian embryos. 2010 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science: From Micro and Nano Scale Systems to Robotics and Mechatronics Systems, MHS 2010, Micro-Nano GCOE 2010, Bio-Manipulation 2010. 2010. pp. 29-34
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