Apatite formation on electrochemically treated titanium

K. Tsuru, S. Takemoto, Satoshi Hayakawa, A. Osaka

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Apatite formation on artificial materials in a body environment is the prerequisite condition for showing bioactivity i.e. bone-bonding ability. A specific hydrated silica or titania gel has the ability of apatite deposition in body environment. We electrochemically prepared such a bioactive titanium oxide layer on titanium(Ti) with a cell consisting of Ti as the working electrode, Pt as the counter one, Ag/AgCl as the reference one, and an aqueous solution of 0.1 mol/L Ca(NO3)2 as the electrolyte solution. Ti was kept at 9.5V for 1 hour for oxidation(denoted as Ca9.5). Ti was subject to cathodic polarization at -3.0V for 10 min(Ca-3.0).: calcium ions were expected to be adsorbed on its surface. On treatment Ca9.5-3.0 Ti was first oxidated at 9.5V for 1 hour and subsequently kept at -3.0V for 10 min. The specimens of Ca9.5-3.0 and Ca-3.0 were found so bioactive as to deposit apatite within 12 hours and 1 day, respectively, in a simulated body fluid(Kokubo solution) whereas those due to Ca9.5 could not deposit apatite within 7 days. Calcium hydroxide and calcium carbonate detected on the bioactive surface caused no harmful effects on spontaneous deposition of apatite in the fluid.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMaterials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings
PublisherMaterials Research Society
Pages141-146
Number of pages6
Volume599
Publication statusPublished - 2000
EventMineralization in Natural and Synthetic Biomaterials - Boston, MA, USA
Duration: Nov 29 1999Dec 1 1999

Other

OtherMineralization in Natural and Synthetic Biomaterials
CityBoston, MA, USA
Period11/29/9912/1/99

Fingerprint

Apatites
Apatite
Titanium
Deposits
Calcium Hydroxide
Cathodic polarization
Calcium Carbonate
Body fluids
Bioactivity
Hydrated lime
Silicon Dioxide
Titanium oxides
Electrolytes
Calcium carbonate
Bone
Gels
Calcium
Ions
Oxidation
Silica

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Tsuru, K., Takemoto, S., Hayakawa, S., & Osaka, A. (2000). Apatite formation on electrochemically treated titanium. In Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings (Vol. 599, pp. 141-146). Materials Research Society.

Apatite formation on electrochemically treated titanium. / Tsuru, K.; Takemoto, S.; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Osaka, A.

Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. Vol. 599 Materials Research Society, 2000. p. 141-146.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tsuru, K, Takemoto, S, Hayakawa, S & Osaka, A 2000, Apatite formation on electrochemically treated titanium. in Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. vol. 599, Materials Research Society, pp. 141-146, Mineralization in Natural and Synthetic Biomaterials, Boston, MA, USA, 11/29/99.
Tsuru K, Takemoto S, Hayakawa S, Osaka A. Apatite formation on electrochemically treated titanium. In Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. Vol. 599. Materials Research Society. 2000. p. 141-146
Tsuru, K. ; Takemoto, S. ; Hayakawa, Satoshi ; Osaka, A. / Apatite formation on electrochemically treated titanium. Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. Vol. 599 Materials Research Society, 2000. pp. 141-146
@inbook{ed85cb4750be481790478ba66fe98267,
title = "Apatite formation on electrochemically treated titanium",
abstract = "Apatite formation on artificial materials in a body environment is the prerequisite condition for showing bioactivity i.e. bone-bonding ability. A specific hydrated silica or titania gel has the ability of apatite deposition in body environment. We electrochemically prepared such a bioactive titanium oxide layer on titanium(Ti) with a cell consisting of Ti as the working electrode, Pt as the counter one, Ag/AgCl as the reference one, and an aqueous solution of 0.1 mol/L Ca(NO3)2 as the electrolyte solution. Ti was kept at 9.5V for 1 hour for oxidation(denoted as Ca9.5). Ti was subject to cathodic polarization at -3.0V for 10 min(Ca-3.0).: calcium ions were expected to be adsorbed on its surface. On treatment Ca9.5-3.0 Ti was first oxidated at 9.5V for 1 hour and subsequently kept at -3.0V for 10 min. The specimens of Ca9.5-3.0 and Ca-3.0 were found so bioactive as to deposit apatite within 12 hours and 1 day, respectively, in a simulated body fluid(Kokubo solution) whereas those due to Ca9.5 could not deposit apatite within 7 days. Calcium hydroxide and calcium carbonate detected on the bioactive surface caused no harmful effects on spontaneous deposition of apatite in the fluid.",
author = "K. Tsuru and S. Takemoto and Satoshi Hayakawa and A. Osaka",
year = "2000",
language = "English",
volume = "599",
pages = "141--146",
booktitle = "Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings",
publisher = "Materials Research Society",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Apatite formation on electrochemically treated titanium

AU - Tsuru, K.

AU - Takemoto, S.

AU - Hayakawa, Satoshi

AU - Osaka, A.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Apatite formation on artificial materials in a body environment is the prerequisite condition for showing bioactivity i.e. bone-bonding ability. A specific hydrated silica or titania gel has the ability of apatite deposition in body environment. We electrochemically prepared such a bioactive titanium oxide layer on titanium(Ti) with a cell consisting of Ti as the working electrode, Pt as the counter one, Ag/AgCl as the reference one, and an aqueous solution of 0.1 mol/L Ca(NO3)2 as the electrolyte solution. Ti was kept at 9.5V for 1 hour for oxidation(denoted as Ca9.5). Ti was subject to cathodic polarization at -3.0V for 10 min(Ca-3.0).: calcium ions were expected to be adsorbed on its surface. On treatment Ca9.5-3.0 Ti was first oxidated at 9.5V for 1 hour and subsequently kept at -3.0V for 10 min. The specimens of Ca9.5-3.0 and Ca-3.0 were found so bioactive as to deposit apatite within 12 hours and 1 day, respectively, in a simulated body fluid(Kokubo solution) whereas those due to Ca9.5 could not deposit apatite within 7 days. Calcium hydroxide and calcium carbonate detected on the bioactive surface caused no harmful effects on spontaneous deposition of apatite in the fluid.

AB - Apatite formation on artificial materials in a body environment is the prerequisite condition for showing bioactivity i.e. bone-bonding ability. A specific hydrated silica or titania gel has the ability of apatite deposition in body environment. We electrochemically prepared such a bioactive titanium oxide layer on titanium(Ti) with a cell consisting of Ti as the working electrode, Pt as the counter one, Ag/AgCl as the reference one, and an aqueous solution of 0.1 mol/L Ca(NO3)2 as the electrolyte solution. Ti was kept at 9.5V for 1 hour for oxidation(denoted as Ca9.5). Ti was subject to cathodic polarization at -3.0V for 10 min(Ca-3.0).: calcium ions were expected to be adsorbed on its surface. On treatment Ca9.5-3.0 Ti was first oxidated at 9.5V for 1 hour and subsequently kept at -3.0V for 10 min. The specimens of Ca9.5-3.0 and Ca-3.0 were found so bioactive as to deposit apatite within 12 hours and 1 day, respectively, in a simulated body fluid(Kokubo solution) whereas those due to Ca9.5 could not deposit apatite within 7 days. Calcium hydroxide and calcium carbonate detected on the bioactive surface caused no harmful effects on spontaneous deposition of apatite in the fluid.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033678074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033678074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

VL - 599

SP - 141

EP - 146

BT - Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings

PB - Materials Research Society

ER -