Anthropogenic and natural forcing impacts on ENSO-like decadal variability during the second half of the 20th century

Hideo Shiogama, Masahiro Watanabe, Masahide Kimoto, Toru Nozawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several climate simulations, performed with an atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model, are made to evaluate the influences of anthropogenic and natural external forcing on the observed fluctuation of the Decadal El Niño-Southern Oscillation (DENSO) during the second half of the 20th century. A comparison of DENSO in the model simulations and the observations suggests that the observed variability includes an unusually large trend relative to that expected from purely natural variations. Moreover, we show that there is a large probability that this trend is mainly attributable to anthropogenic factors.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberL21714
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume32
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 16 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Southern Oscillation
El Nino-Southern Oscillation
trends
climate
simulation
general circulation model
oceans
atmospheres
atmosphere
ocean
trend
comparison
anthropogenic factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Anthropogenic and natural forcing impacts on ENSO-like decadal variability during the second half of the 20th century. / Shiogama, Hideo; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Nozawa, Toru.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 32, No. 21, L21714, 16.11.2005, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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