An intensive group therapy programme for smoking cessation using nicotine patch and internet mailing supports in a university setting

Katsuyuki Hotta, K. Kinumi, K. Naito, K. Kuroki, H. Sakane, A. Imai, M. Kobayashi, Masaru Onishi, T. Ogura, H. Miura, Y. Takahashi, K. Tobe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: Despite the growing literature on workplace tobacco control policies, very few studies have evaluated the role of smoking cessation programme as one of these policies in a university setting. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of intensive cessation programme delivered in a group format using nicotine patch therapy and internet mailing supports for our university employees. Methods: From January 2003, we conducted the group therapy programme for smoking cession seven times in Okayama University, Japan. This programme consisted of nicotine patch therapy and on-line supporting system. Smoking status was regularly assessed by direct interviews. Results: A total of 102 employees were enrolled in this programme, of whom 101 initiated their smoking cessation. One hundred participants (99%) received nicotine patch therapy, and its toxicities were generally mild. Of the 94 employees who could be follow-up for a year after the cessation, 50 (53%) sustained abstinence for a year. Multivariate analysis revealed that writing and sending e-mail messages within the first 1 week were significant factors affecting long-term cessation. The type of position also affected the cessation rate. Conclusion: This study suggests that our programme in a university setting seems to be effective mainly because of peer-supports among the participants through regular face-to-face meetings and their own mailing supports.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1997-2001
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Practice
Volume61
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

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Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Smoking Cessation
Group Psychotherapy
Internet
Smoking
Online Systems
Postal Service
Workplace
Tobacco
Japan
Therapeutics
Multivariate Analysis
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

An intensive group therapy programme for smoking cessation using nicotine patch and internet mailing supports in a university setting. / Hotta, Katsuyuki; Kinumi, K.; Naito, K.; Kuroki, K.; Sakane, H.; Imai, A.; Kobayashi, M.; Onishi, Masaru; Ogura, T.; Miura, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Tobe, K.

In: International Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 61, No. 12, 12.2007, p. 1997-2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hotta, Katsuyuki ; Kinumi, K. ; Naito, K. ; Kuroki, K. ; Sakane, H. ; Imai, A. ; Kobayashi, M. ; Onishi, Masaru ; Ogura, T. ; Miura, H. ; Takahashi, Y. ; Tobe, K. / An intensive group therapy programme for smoking cessation using nicotine patch and internet mailing supports in a university setting. In: International Journal of Clinical Practice. 2007 ; Vol. 61, No. 12. pp. 1997-2001.
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