An ecological analysis of the herbivory-elicited JA burst and its metabolism: Plant memory processes and predictions of the moving target model

William Stork, Celia Diezel, Rayko Halitschke, Ivan Galis, Ian T. Baldwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Rapid herbivore-induced jasmonic acid (JA) accumulation is known to mediate many induced defense responses in vascular plants, but little is known about how JA bursts are metabolized and modified in response to repeated elicitations, are propagated throughout elicited leaves, or how they directly influence herbivores. Methodology/Principal Findings: We found the JA burst in a native population of Nicotiana attenuata to be highly robust despite environmental variation and we examined the JA bursts produced by repeated elicitations with Manduca sexta oral secretions (OS) at whole- and within-leaf spatial scales. Surprisingly, a 2nd OS-elicitation suppressed an expected JA burst at both spatial scales, but subsequent elicitations caused more rapid JA accumulation in elicited tissue. The baseline of induced JA/JA-Ile increased with number of elicitations in discrete intervals. Large veins constrained the spatial spread of JA bursts, leading to heterogeneity within elicited leaves. 1st-instar M. sexta larvae were repelled by elicitations and changed feeding sites. JA conjugated with isoleucine (JA-Ile) translates elicitations into defense production (e.g., TPIs), but conjugation efficiency varied among sectors and depended on NaWRKY3/6 transcription factors. Elicited TPI activity correlated strongly with the heterogeneity of JA/JA-Ile accumulations after a single elicitation, but not repeated elicitations. Conclusions/Significance: Ecologically informed scaling of leaf elicitation reveals the contribution of repeated herbivory events to the formation of plant memory of herbivory and the causes and importance of heterogeneity in induced defense responses. Leaf vasculature, in addition to transmitting long-distance damage cues, creates heterogeneity in JA bursts within attacked leaves that may be difficult for an attacking herbivore to predict. Such unpredictability is a central tenet of the Moving Target Model of defense, which posits that variability in itself is defensive.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere4697
JournalPLoS One
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 11 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Herbivory
jasmonic acid
Metabolism
herbivores
Data storage equipment
metabolism
prediction
Manduca
leaves
Manduca sexta
mouth
secretion
Isoleucine
isoleucine
plant veins
vascular plants
Tobacco
Cues
Larva
Blood Vessels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

An ecological analysis of the herbivory-elicited JA burst and its metabolism : Plant memory processes and predictions of the moving target model. / Stork, William; Diezel, Celia; Halitschke, Rayko; Galis, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 4, No. 3, e4697, 11.03.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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