An analysis of video-assisted thoracoscopic resection for mediastinal masses in 150 cases: An overview of the pansternal approach, histology, and complications

A. Akashi, K. Hazama, S. Miyoshi, M. Minami, H. Matsuda, T. Kido

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To clarify the usefulness of the diagnosis and treatment of mediastinal masses, by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), we performed a retrospective multiinstitutional study to delineate the type of approach, histopathology, and complications associated with these entities. Methods: We analyzed 150 patients who underwent the VATS procedure at several institutions between 1991 and 1999. Results: VATS resections were performed using various combinations of the "pansternal approach." The unilateral thorax approach was applied in 135 patients, the bilateral thorax approach combined with the suprasternum approach in seven patients, the unilateral thoracic approach combined with the supraclavicular approach in three patients, the infrasternal approach in three patients, and the bilateral thoracic approach combined with both the infrasternal and the suprasternal approaches in two patients. Thoracoscopic resections or biopsies diagnosed 140 benign and 10 malignant mediastinal masses. There were operative complications in nine patients (6%). Eight patients (5.3%) were converted to conventional thoracotomy. Conclusion: VATS is a safe, effective, minimally invasive technique that can facilitate the resection of mediastinal masses when the pansternal approach is applied as appropriate for the location of the tumor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1167-1170
Number of pages4
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume15
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Histology
Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery
Thorax
Thoracotomy
Retrospective Studies
Biopsy
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Mediastinal mass
  • Pansternal approach
  • Surgical resection
  • Thoracic disease
  • Video-assisted thoracic surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

An analysis of video-assisted thoracoscopic resection for mediastinal masses in 150 cases : An overview of the pansternal approach, histology, and complications. / Akashi, A.; Hazama, K.; Miyoshi, S.; Minami, M.; Matsuda, H.; Kido, T.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 15, No. 10, 2001, p. 1167-1170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Minami, M.

AU - Matsuda, H.

AU - Kido, T.

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