Alcohol consumption and incident dementia in older Japanese adults: The Okayama Study

Yangyang Liu, Toshiharu Mitsuhashi, Michiyo Yamakawa, Megumi Sasai, Toshihide Tsuda, Hiroyuki Doi, Jun Hamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the association between the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption and incident dementia in older Japanese adults using large sample size data over a long follow-up period. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study carried out in Japan. A total of 53 311 older adults were followed from 2008 to 2014. A health checkup questionnaire was used to assess the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption. The Dementia Scale of long-term care insurance was used as a measure of incident dementia. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios, with their 95% confidence intervals, for the incidence of dementia across the categories of alcohol consumption by sex. Results: During a 7-year follow-up period, 14 479 participants were regarded as having incident dementia. Compared with non-drinkers, the multivariate adjusted hazard ratios for participants with alcohol consumption ≤2 units per day, occasionally (0.88, 95% CI 0.81–0.96 in men and 0.84, 95% 0.79–0.90 in women) and daily (0.79, 95% 0.73–0.85 in men and 0.87, 95% 0.78–0.97 in women) were statistically significant, and the difference between occasional and daily consumption was only statistically significant in men; however, for participants with alcohol consumption >2 units per day, occasionally (0.91, 95% 0.71–1.16 in men and 1.09, 95% 0.72–1.67 in women) and daily (0.89, 95% 0.81–1.00 in men and 1.16, 95% 0.84–1.81 in women) were not significant. Conclusions: Alcohol consumption of ≤2 units per day, occasionally or daily, could reduce the risk of incident dementia, with greater benefit for men with such daily consumption. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; ••: ••–••.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGeriatrics and Gerontology International
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

alcohol consumption
dementia
Alcohol Drinking
Dementia
incident
Long-Term Care Insurance
long-term care insurance
Proportional Hazards Models
Sample Size
Japan
Cohort Studies
incidence
Retrospective Studies
confidence
Confidence Intervals
questionnaire
Incidence
Health
health

Keywords

  • alcohol consumption
  • dementia
  • elderly
  • Japanese
  • long-term care insurance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Alcohol consumption and incident dementia in older Japanese adults : The Okayama Study. / Liu, Yangyang; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Yamakawa, Michiyo; Sasai, Megumi; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Jun.

In: Geriatrics and Gerontology International, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d8813abf0b444d67bce2010db7c2814e,
title = "Alcohol consumption and incident dementia in older Japanese adults: The Okayama Study",
abstract = "Aim: To evaluate the association between the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption and incident dementia in older Japanese adults using large sample size data over a long follow-up period. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study carried out in Japan. A total of 53 311 older adults were followed from 2008 to 2014. A health checkup questionnaire was used to assess the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption. The Dementia Scale of long-term care insurance was used as a measure of incident dementia. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios, with their 95{\%} confidence intervals, for the incidence of dementia across the categories of alcohol consumption by sex. Results: During a 7-year follow-up period, 14 479 participants were regarded as having incident dementia. Compared with non-drinkers, the multivariate adjusted hazard ratios for participants with alcohol consumption ≤2 units per day, occasionally (0.88, 95{\%} CI 0.81–0.96 in men and 0.84, 95{\%} 0.79–0.90 in women) and daily (0.79, 95{\%} 0.73–0.85 in men and 0.87, 95{\%} 0.78–0.97 in women) were statistically significant, and the difference between occasional and daily consumption was only statistically significant in men; however, for participants with alcohol consumption >2 units per day, occasionally (0.91, 95{\%} 0.71–1.16 in men and 1.09, 95{\%} 0.72–1.67 in women) and daily (0.89, 95{\%} 0.81–1.00 in men and 1.16, 95{\%} 0.84–1.81 in women) were not significant. Conclusions: Alcohol consumption of ≤2 units per day, occasionally or daily, could reduce the risk of incident dementia, with greater benefit for men with such daily consumption. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; ••: ••–••.",
keywords = "alcohol consumption, dementia, elderly, Japanese, long-term care insurance",
author = "Yangyang Liu and Toshiharu Mitsuhashi and Michiyo Yamakawa and Megumi Sasai and Toshihide Tsuda and Hiroyuki Doi and Jun Hamada",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ggi.13694",
language = "English",
journal = "Geriatrics and Gerontology International",
issn = "1447-0594",
publisher = "Japan Geriatrics Society",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alcohol consumption and incident dementia in older Japanese adults

T2 - The Okayama Study

AU - Liu, Yangyang

AU - Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu

AU - Yamakawa, Michiyo

AU - Sasai, Megumi

AU - Tsuda, Toshihide

AU - Doi, Hiroyuki

AU - Hamada, Jun

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Aim: To evaluate the association between the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption and incident dementia in older Japanese adults using large sample size data over a long follow-up period. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study carried out in Japan. A total of 53 311 older adults were followed from 2008 to 2014. A health checkup questionnaire was used to assess the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption. The Dementia Scale of long-term care insurance was used as a measure of incident dementia. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios, with their 95% confidence intervals, for the incidence of dementia across the categories of alcohol consumption by sex. Results: During a 7-year follow-up period, 14 479 participants were regarded as having incident dementia. Compared with non-drinkers, the multivariate adjusted hazard ratios for participants with alcohol consumption ≤2 units per day, occasionally (0.88, 95% CI 0.81–0.96 in men and 0.84, 95% 0.79–0.90 in women) and daily (0.79, 95% 0.73–0.85 in men and 0.87, 95% 0.78–0.97 in women) were statistically significant, and the difference between occasional and daily consumption was only statistically significant in men; however, for participants with alcohol consumption >2 units per day, occasionally (0.91, 95% 0.71–1.16 in men and 1.09, 95% 0.72–1.67 in women) and daily (0.89, 95% 0.81–1.00 in men and 1.16, 95% 0.84–1.81 in women) were not significant. Conclusions: Alcohol consumption of ≤2 units per day, occasionally or daily, could reduce the risk of incident dementia, with greater benefit for men with such daily consumption. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; ••: ••–••.

AB - Aim: To evaluate the association between the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption and incident dementia in older Japanese adults using large sample size data over a long follow-up period. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study carried out in Japan. A total of 53 311 older adults were followed from 2008 to 2014. A health checkup questionnaire was used to assess the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption. The Dementia Scale of long-term care insurance was used as a measure of incident dementia. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios, with their 95% confidence intervals, for the incidence of dementia across the categories of alcohol consumption by sex. Results: During a 7-year follow-up period, 14 479 participants were regarded as having incident dementia. Compared with non-drinkers, the multivariate adjusted hazard ratios for participants with alcohol consumption ≤2 units per day, occasionally (0.88, 95% CI 0.81–0.96 in men and 0.84, 95% 0.79–0.90 in women) and daily (0.79, 95% 0.73–0.85 in men and 0.87, 95% 0.78–0.97 in women) were statistically significant, and the difference between occasional and daily consumption was only statistically significant in men; however, for participants with alcohol consumption >2 units per day, occasionally (0.91, 95% 0.71–1.16 in men and 1.09, 95% 0.72–1.67 in women) and daily (0.89, 95% 0.81–1.00 in men and 1.16, 95% 0.84–1.81 in women) were not significant. Conclusions: Alcohol consumption of ≤2 units per day, occasionally or daily, could reduce the risk of incident dementia, with greater benefit for men with such daily consumption. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; ••: ••–••.

KW - alcohol consumption

KW - dementia

KW - elderly

KW - Japanese

KW - long-term care insurance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067392719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85067392719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ggi.13694

DO - 10.1111/ggi.13694

M3 - Article

C2 - 31173440

AN - SCOPUS:85067392719

JO - Geriatrics and Gerontology International

JF - Geriatrics and Gerontology International

SN - 1447-0594

ER -