A tilting embryo culture system increases the number of high-grade human blastocysts with high implantation competence

Tetsuaki Hara, Koji Matsuura, Takashi Kodama, Keiko Sato, Yuko Kikkawa, Tomomi Muneto, Junko Tanaka, Keiji Naruse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human embryos normally experience mechanical stimuli during development in vivo. To apply appropriate stimuli to embryos, this study group developed a tilting embryo culture system (TECS) and investigated whether it could improve the grade of fresh human embryos compared with a control static culture system. A total of 450 retrieved oocytes from 32 IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles of 32 women were cultured for 5-6 days. Oocytes were divided randomly into TECS and control groups and then were inseminated in vitro. All embryos were evaluated at days 3 and 5 using standard grading criteria for embryo quality. The rates of fertilization per mature oocyte and high-grade cleavage-stage embryo formation in the TECS group were similar to those in the control group. The rates of blastocyst formation and of blastocysts graded 3BB or higher at day 5 were significantly higher in the TECS group than those in the control group: 45.3% (67/148) versus 32.1% (51/159) (P = 0.018) and 29.1% (43/148) versus 17.6% (28/159) (P = 0.018), respectively. The TECS group produced more high-grade blastocysts than the control group. Embryo movement or mechanical stimulation during embryo culture may be beneficial for human embryonic development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)260-268
Number of pages9
JournalReproductive BioMedicine Online
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • blastocyst
  • embryonic development
  • mechanical stimuli
  • microenvironment
  • tilting embryo culture system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Developmental Biology

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