A specific area of the compound eye in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus sends photic information to the circadian pacemaker in the contralateral optic lobe

K. Tomioka, M. Yukizane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The circadian locomotor rhythm of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is primarily regulated by a pair of interacting optic lobe circadian pacemaker systems. The interaction involves phase-dependent modulation of the free- running period and phase-dependent suppression of activity. Since photic information has been shown to be involved in the interaction, we examined the regional difference in photoreception for the interaction within cricket compound eyes. The activity rhythm of animals receiving partial reduction of one compound eye combined with severance of the contralateral optic nerve split into entrained and free-running components under a 13-h light to 13-h dark cycle. All the animals operated on showed a phase-dependent suppression of activity, and most animals showed a phase-dependent modulation of the period of the free-running component. However, removal of the dorsocaudal area of the compound eye resulted in a severe reduction of the amplitude of the phase-dependent-period modulation. These results suggest that the dorsocaudal portion of the compound eye is a specific region receiving photic signals that are transmitted to the circadian pacemaker in the contralateral optic lobe and that the phase-dependent suppression of activity is caused by a mechanism separate from that for the period modulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-70
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology - A Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
Volume180
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Circadian rhythm
  • Compound eye
  • Cricket Entrainment
  • Optic lobe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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