A review of polymerization contraction: The influence of stress development versus stress relief

R. M. Carvalho, J. C. Pereira, Masahiro Yoshiyama, D. H. Pashley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

284 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The insertion of bonded resin composites into cavity preparations leads to a competition between polymerization contraction forces and the strength of bonds to tooth structure. The degree of stress development can be controlled, to some extent, by the cavity design (C-factor), the use of bases, the size, shape, and position of increments of composite resins placed in the cavity, and whether the resin is light- or chemically cured. Stress relief can be accomplished by maintaining the C-factor as low as possible, using chemical-curing resins, low modulus liners, and, over time, by water sorption. A thorough understanding of these principles permits clinicians to exercise more control over these variables, thereby improving the quality of their bonded restorations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalOperative Dentistry
Volume21
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Composite Resins
Polymerization
Tooth
Light
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

A review of polymerization contraction : The influence of stress development versus stress relief. / Carvalho, R. M.; Pereira, J. C.; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Pashley, D. H.

In: Operative Dentistry, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.1996, p. 17-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carvalho, R. M. ; Pereira, J. C. ; Yoshiyama, Masahiro ; Pashley, D. H. / A review of polymerization contraction : The influence of stress development versus stress relief. In: Operative Dentistry. 1996 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 17-24.
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