A rare complication

Misdirection of an indwelling urethral catheter into the ureter

Tsutomu Ishikaw, Motoo Araki, Takeshi Hirata, Masami Watanabe, Shin Ebara, Toyohiko Watanabe, Yasutomo Nasu, Hiromi Kumon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report 3 patients with the rare complication of an indwelling urethral catheter misdirected into the ureter. This is the largest series to date. Patients were referred to us for a variety of reasons following exchange of their chronic indwelling urinary catheters. CT in all cases demonstrated the urinary catheters residing in the left ureter. The ages of the patients were 37, 67 and 81 years old. All patients suffered from neurogenic bladder. Two patients were female, one was male, and 2 of the 3 had a sensory disorder inhibiting their pain response. The catheters were replaced with open-end Foley catheters. Extensive follow-up CT scans were obtained in one case, demonstrating improvement of hydronephrosis and no evidence of ureteral stenosis. Cystoscopy in this patient demonstrated normally positioned and functioning ureteral orifices. Although the placement of an indwelling urethral catheter is a comparatively safe procedure, one must keep in mind that this complication can occur, particularly in female patients with neurogenic bladder. CT without contrast is a noninvasive, definitive diagnostic tool.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-51
Number of pages5
JournalActa Medica Okayama
Volume68
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Urinary Catheters
Indwelling Catheters
Catheters
Ureter
Neurogenic Urinary Bladder
Sensation Disorders
Computerized tomography
Cystoscopy
Orifices
Hydronephrosis
Pathologic Constriction
Pain

Keywords

  • Complication
  • Computed tomography
  • Imaging
  • Indwelling urethral catheter
  • Ureter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

A rare complication : Misdirection of an indwelling urethral catheter into the ureter. / Ishikaw, Tsutomu; Araki, Motoo; Hirata, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masami; Ebara, Shin; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi.

In: Acta Medica Okayama, Vol. 68, No. 1, 2014, p. 47-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{aa319835756746f09034e97f63cb5d27,
title = "A rare complication: Misdirection of an indwelling urethral catheter into the ureter",
abstract = "We report 3 patients with the rare complication of an indwelling urethral catheter misdirected into the ureter. This is the largest series to date. Patients were referred to us for a variety of reasons following exchange of their chronic indwelling urinary catheters. CT in all cases demonstrated the urinary catheters residing in the left ureter. The ages of the patients were 37, 67 and 81 years old. All patients suffered from neurogenic bladder. Two patients were female, one was male, and 2 of the 3 had a sensory disorder inhibiting their pain response. The catheters were replaced with open-end Foley catheters. Extensive follow-up CT scans were obtained in one case, demonstrating improvement of hydronephrosis and no evidence of ureteral stenosis. Cystoscopy in this patient demonstrated normally positioned and functioning ureteral orifices. Although the placement of an indwelling urethral catheter is a comparatively safe procedure, one must keep in mind that this complication can occur, particularly in female patients with neurogenic bladder. CT without contrast is a noninvasive, definitive diagnostic tool.",
keywords = "Complication, Computed tomography, Imaging, Indwelling urethral catheter, Ureter",
author = "Tsutomu Ishikaw and Motoo Araki and Takeshi Hirata and Masami Watanabe and Shin Ebara and Toyohiko Watanabe and Yasutomo Nasu and Hiromi Kumon",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "47--51",
journal = "Acta Medica Okayama",
issn = "0386-300X",
publisher = "Okayama University",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A rare complication

T2 - Misdirection of an indwelling urethral catheter into the ureter

AU - Ishikaw, Tsutomu

AU - Araki, Motoo

AU - Hirata, Takeshi

AU - Watanabe, Masami

AU - Ebara, Shin

AU - Watanabe, Toyohiko

AU - Nasu, Yasutomo

AU - Kumon, Hiromi

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - We report 3 patients with the rare complication of an indwelling urethral catheter misdirected into the ureter. This is the largest series to date. Patients were referred to us for a variety of reasons following exchange of their chronic indwelling urinary catheters. CT in all cases demonstrated the urinary catheters residing in the left ureter. The ages of the patients were 37, 67 and 81 years old. All patients suffered from neurogenic bladder. Two patients were female, one was male, and 2 of the 3 had a sensory disorder inhibiting their pain response. The catheters were replaced with open-end Foley catheters. Extensive follow-up CT scans were obtained in one case, demonstrating improvement of hydronephrosis and no evidence of ureteral stenosis. Cystoscopy in this patient demonstrated normally positioned and functioning ureteral orifices. Although the placement of an indwelling urethral catheter is a comparatively safe procedure, one must keep in mind that this complication can occur, particularly in female patients with neurogenic bladder. CT without contrast is a noninvasive, definitive diagnostic tool.

AB - We report 3 patients with the rare complication of an indwelling urethral catheter misdirected into the ureter. This is the largest series to date. Patients were referred to us for a variety of reasons following exchange of their chronic indwelling urinary catheters. CT in all cases demonstrated the urinary catheters residing in the left ureter. The ages of the patients were 37, 67 and 81 years old. All patients suffered from neurogenic bladder. Two patients were female, one was male, and 2 of the 3 had a sensory disorder inhibiting their pain response. The catheters were replaced with open-end Foley catheters. Extensive follow-up CT scans were obtained in one case, demonstrating improvement of hydronephrosis and no evidence of ureteral stenosis. Cystoscopy in this patient demonstrated normally positioned and functioning ureteral orifices. Although the placement of an indwelling urethral catheter is a comparatively safe procedure, one must keep in mind that this complication can occur, particularly in female patients with neurogenic bladder. CT without contrast is a noninvasive, definitive diagnostic tool.

KW - Complication

KW - Computed tomography

KW - Imaging

KW - Indwelling urethral catheter

KW - Ureter

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894517117&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84894517117&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 68

SP - 47

EP - 51

JO - Acta Medica Okayama

JF - Acta Medica Okayama

SN - 0386-300X

IS - 1

ER -