A new cytosolic pathway from a Parkinson disease-associated kinase, BRPK/PINK1: Activation of AKT via MTORC2

Hitoshi Murata, Masakiyo Sakaguchi, Yu Jin, Yoshihiko Sakaguchi, Junichiro Futami, Hidenori Yamada, Ken Kataoka, Nam Ho Huh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Accumulating evidence indicates that dysfunction of mitochondria is a common feature of Parkinson disease. Functional loss of a familial Parkinson disease-linked gene, BRPK/PINK1 (PINK1), results in deterioration of mitochondrial functions and eventual neuronal cell death. A mitochondrial chaperone protein has been shown to be a substrate of PINK1 kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that PINK1 has another action point in the cytoplasm. Phosphorylation of Akt at Ser-473 was enhanced by overexpression of PINK1, and the Akt activation was crucial for protection of SH-SY5Y cells from various cytotoxic agents, including oxidative stress. Enhanced Akt phosphorylation was not due to activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase but due to activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) by PINK1. Rictor, a specific component of mTORC2, was phosphorylated by overexpression of PINK1. Furthermore, overexpression of PINK1 enhanced cell motility. These results indicate that PINK1 exerts its cytoprotective function not only in mitochondria but also in the cytoplasm through activation of mTORC2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7182-7189
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume286
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 4 2011

Fingerprint

Parkinson Disease
Phosphotransferases
Chemical activation
Phosphorylation
Mitochondria
Cytoplasm
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase
Mitochondrial Proteins
Cytotoxins
Oxidative stress
Cell Movement
Oxidative Stress
Cell Death
Cell death
Deterioration
Genes
TOR complex 2
Substrates
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

A new cytosolic pathway from a Parkinson disease-associated kinase, BRPK/PINK1 : Activation of AKT via MTORC2. / Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Jin, Yu; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Futami, Junichiro; Yamada, Hidenori; Kataoka, Ken; Huh, Nam Ho.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 286, No. 9, 04.03.2011, p. 7182-7189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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