A multidrug resistance-associated protein inhibitor is a potential enhancer of the benzyl isothiocyanate-induced apoptosis induction in human colorectal cancer cells

Qifu Yang, Toshiyuki Nakamura, Masayuki Seto, Miku Miyagawa, Wensi Xu, Beiwei Zhu, Shintaro Munemasa, Yoshiyuki Murata, Yoshimasa Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The increasing drug efflux through the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is the most plausible mechanism that mediates resistance to the anticancer phytochemicals, such as benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), as well as chemotherapy drugs. To identify a potential component to overcome this resistance by combinatory utilization, we focused on multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) pumping various drug metabolites with glutathione as well as the organic anions. The pharmacological treatment of an MRP inhibitor, MK571, significantly potentiated the BITC-induced antiproliferation, coincided with the enhanced accumulation of BITC and glutathione in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells. MK571 also enhanced the apoptosis induction as well as activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases and caspase-3, whereas it did not affect their basal levels. These results suggested that, since MRPs might play a pivotal role in the BITC efflux, MK571 potentiates the BITC-induced antiproliferation in human colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of the glutathione-dependent BITC efflux.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • apoptosis
  • benzyl isothiocyanate
  • colorectal cancer
  • MK571
  • multidrug resistance-associated proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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